Press/Journalists

September 2, 2011

The National Archives Presents Noontime Programs in October

Washington, DC…The National Archives will present special noontime programs in October, on topics ranging from Civil Rights and Negro League baseball to the Berlin candy bomber. These events are free and open to the public and will be held at the National Archives Building in Washington, DC, which is located on the National Mall and is fully accessible. Attendees should use the Special Events entrance on Constitution Avenue at Seventh Street, NW.

Wednesday, October 5, at noon, Jefferson Room
Book Talk:  Cuban Star: How One Negro League Owner Changed the Face of Baseball
In celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month, Adrian Burgos, Jr., highlights the complex life of Alex Pompez, son of Cuban immigrants, who made tremendous strides for Negro League baseball and can be credited for the diversity in today’s Major League Baseball. A book signing will follow the program, and the book is available at a discount from the Archives Shop (202-357-5271) before and during the event.

Thursday, October 6, at noon, William G. McGowan Theater
Book Talk:  The Berlin Candy Bomber
In June 1948, Russia blockaded the city of Berlin and the Americans, French, and British began massive airlift of food and supplies. Gail Halvorsen was one of the hundreds of U.S. pilots involved in the airlift. On one flight, he met a group of children who were thrilled when he offered them sticks of chewing gum. Afterwards, he began to drop small bundles of candy using parachutes made from handkerchiefs. Word spread to America and soon candy contributions came from all across the country. A book signing will follow the program, and the book is available at a discount from the Archives Shop (202-357-5271) before and during the event.

Wednesday, October 12, at noon, William G. McGowan Theater
Book Talk:Westmoreland: The General Who Lost Vietnam
Military historian Lewis Sorley discusses how General William Westmoreland, commander of the 101st Airborne Division and Superintendent of West Point, was chosen to lead the war effort in Vietnam—and why this selection turned out to be a disaster for the American military. A book signing will follow the program, and the book is available at a discount from the Archives Shop (202-357-5271) before and during the event.

Friday, October 28, at noon, Jefferson Room
Book Talk:  Count Them One by One: Black Mississippians Fighting for the Right to Vote
Forrest County, Mississippi, became a focal point of the civil rights movement in 1961 when the U.S. Justice Department filed a lawsuit against Theron Lynd, Mississippi’s voting registrar. Gordon A. Martin, Jr., was one of the Justice Department’s trial attorneys assigned to the help shape the federal case against Lynd, which resulted in the first trial to convict a Southern registrar for contempt of court and served as a model for other challenges to voter discrimination. A book signing will follow the program, and the book is available at a discount from the Archives Shop (202-357-5271) before and during the event.

To verify dates and times of the programs, call 202-357-5000 or view the Calendar of Events online. To request an accommodation (e.g., sign language interpreter) for a public program, please e-mail public.program@nara.gov or call (202) 357-5000 at least two weeks prior to the event.

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For press information, contact the National Archives Public Affairs Staff at (202) 357-5300.

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