Press/Journalists

Press Release
May 3, 2011

The National Archives Presents Noontime Programs in May

Washington, DC…The National Archives presents six noontime programs in May, on topics ranging from Civil War medicine to the Nuremberg Laws. These events are free and open to the public and will be held at the National Archives Building in Washington, DC, which is located on the National Mall and is fully accessible. Attendees should use the Special Events entrance on Constitution Avenue at Seventh Street, NW.

LECTURE:  Civil War Medicine
Monday, May 9, at noon, William G. McGowan Theater
Popular culture has given the world a vivid, if simplistic view of medical practice during the Civil War. George Wunderlich, executive director of the National Museum of Civil War Medicine, explains the truth about Civil War medicine and why it still provides life-saving lessons in our technologically advanced society. This program is presented in partnership with the National Archives Assembly and the National Museum of Civil War Medicine.

BOOK TALK:  MacArthur: America’s General
Wednesday, May 11, at noon, William G. McGowan Theater
When Douglas MacArthur addressed Congress in 1951, he was the most popular man in America after having served his country in a military career that spanned 52 years and service in three major wars. National Archives archivist Mitch Yockelson takes a fresh look at the fascinating and influential leader in his new book, MacArthur: America’s General. A book signing will follow the program; the book is available at a discount from the Archives Shop (202-357-5271) before and during the event.

FILM: The Old Man and the Sea
Saturday, May 14 at noon, William G. McGowan Theater
In celebration of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, the National Archives presents this 1958 motion picture featuring the Oscar®-nominated work of James Wong Howe, one of Hollywood’s most celebrated cinematographers. Howe, who emigrated from China with his family in 1899, became an American citizen in the 1950s. (86 minutes.)

LECTURE:  The Nuremberg Laws
Tuesday, May 17, at noon, William G. McGowan Theater
National Archives archivist Greg Bradsher and National Archives exhibits conservator Terry Boone will discuss the creation of the Nuremberg Laws, their status during the war, their recovery by the Americans in April 1945, and their travels from Germany to California to the National Archives in Washington, DC. Bradsher and Boone were able to piece together most of the story by what the records, and associated documentation, told them. This program is presented in partnership with the National Archives Assembly.

PANEL DISCUSSION:  Are You In? Citizen Archivists, Crowdsourcing, and Open Government
Wednesday, May 18, at noon, William G. McGowan Theater
With the proliferation of Web 2.0 technologies, the ways in which the National Archives (and other archives) does business is rapidly changing. In the age of wikis, blogs, and interactivity, the gap between professional and “amateur” archivists, researchers, and scientists has diminished, and the flow of information is now more of a two-way street. A panel including Matt Knutzen, Geospatial Librarian at the New York Public Library, and Pamela Wright, Chief Digital Access Strategist at the National Archives, will demonstrate archival projects that allow citizens to contribute.

BOOK TALK:  The First American Republic: 1774–1789
Thursday, May 19, at noon, William G. McGowan Theater
George Washington’s inauguration in April 1789 marked the beginning of government under the new U.S. Constitution. What few Americans realize is that there had been a fully functioning national government prior to 1789. It was called the Continental Congress, and it was in every respect the First American Republic. It began on September 5, 1774, when elected delegates from 11 of the American colonies first assembled in Philadelphia. Author Thomas Patrick Chorlton discusses his book, The First American Republic: 1774–1789 (The First Fourteen American Presidents Before Washington), which provides previously unknown context to the initial founding of the United States of America. A book signing will follow the program; the book is available at a discount from the Archives Shop (202-357-5271) before and during the event.

To verify dates and times of the programs, call 202-357-5000 or view the Calendar of Events onlinew. To request an accommodation (e.g., sign language interpreter) for a public program, please e-mail public.program@nara.gov or call (202) 357-5000 at least two weeks prior to the event.

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For Press information, contact the National Archives Public Affairs staff at 202-357-5300.

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