Press/Journalists
Press Release
November 26, 1997
January Films at the National Archives and Records Administration

Washington, DC . . . The National Archives and Records Administration presents a free film series to set the stage for Black History Month.

The screenings are held in the theater of the National Archives Building, Pennsylvania Avenue between 7th and 9th Streets, NW and in the auditorium at National Archives II at College Park, which is located at 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD. All programs are free and open to the public. The times and dates can be verified by calling the National Archives public events line at(202) 501-5000.

WASHINGTON, DC FILMS

  • Thursday, January 8
    Black History series
    The Second American Revolution, Part I. This program from the PBS series A Walk Through the Twentieth Century with Bill Moyers provides a comprehensive overview of the civil rights movement. Part I covers the period through 1930, during which the foundations for the civil rights movement were laid. Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee join Moyers to examine the various and sometimes conflicting paths the black leaders of the time advocated. (60 minutes.) Noon. Theater.

  • Friday, January 9
    Black History series
    The Second American Revolution, Part II, examines the 58 years between two landmark Supreme Court civil rights decisions: the enforcement of the "separate but equal" laws in 1896 and the 1954 reversal of segregation in public schools. (60 minutes.) Noon. Theater.

  • Friday, January 16
    Black History series
    Promised Land: Montgomery After Martin Luther King, Jr., 1993. This documentary sets out to portray the current tensions and frustrations, hopes and fears, of Montgomery, Alabama, the city that was at the center of the civil rights struggle of the 1950's and 1960's. An Otmoor Production. (50 minutes.) Noon. Theater.

  • Friday, January 23
    Black History series
    The Freedom Train, 1995. The National Negro Labor Council (NNLC), formed in 1951, was the forerunner of the civil rights movement that followed in the 1960's. Its mission was to advance blacks in the workplace and eliminate racism inside the unions. This film draws on the collective memory of the surviving members to tell the little-known story of the NNLC. (28 minutes.)

    Rosa Parks: The Path to Freedom, 1996. It has been only 40 years since the fateful day on which Mrs. Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on the bus, yet the chain of events that she set in motion has changed this country forever. This film is a biography of this dynamic but quiet woman, whose demand for her civil rights led to the social changes of the sixties. (20 minutes.) Noon. Theater.

  • Friday, January 30
    Black History series
    Seven Songs for Malcolm X, 1993. This documentary is an homage to the inspirational African American civil rights leader. The film combines archival film footage of the man himself, extracts from his writing, and recollections of his family, friends, and fellow activists. A film by John Akomfrah. (52 minutes.) Noon. Theater.

    COLLEGE PARK FILMS

  • Monday, January 5
    The Second American Revolution, Part I (60 minutes.) Noon.

  • Wednesday, January 7
    The Second American Revolution, Part II (60 minutes.) Noon.

  • Wednesday, January 14
    Promised Land: Montgomery After Martin Luther King, Jr. (50 minutes.) Noon.

  • Wednesday, January 21
    The Freedom Train (28 minutes.) Noon.

    Rosa Parks: The Path to Freedom (20 minutes.) Noon.

  • Wednesday, January 28
    Seven Songs for Malcolm X (52 minutes.) Noon.

    For additional PRESS information, please contact the National Archives Public Affairs staff at (301) 837-1700 or e-mail public.affairs@nara.gov.

    98-26

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