National Archives at Kansas City

Location:

National Archives at Kansas City
400 West Pershing Road
Kansas City, MO 64108

Exhibits at the National Archives at Kansas City

National Archives at Kansas City Calendar of Events

All activities are free and open to the public unless noted.

Reservations are requested for all programs and workshops by calling 816-268-8010 or emailing kansascity.educate@nara.gov.

Wednesday, August 5
5:30-6:30 p.m. - reception at the National Archives, 400 West Pershing Road, Kansas City, MO
7:00 p.m. - program lecture at the National World War I Museum, 100 West 26th Street, Kansas City, MO
World War I and the Creation of the Modern Middle East presented by Dr. Carla L. Klausner from the University of Missouri- Kansas City. This program is presented in partnership with the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education and National World War I Museum and is a part of the exhibit lecture series for Discovery and Recovery: Preserving Iraqi Jewish Heritage.

Wednesday, August 12
5:30-6:30 p.m. - reception at the National Archives, 400 West Pershing Road, Kansas City, MO
7:00 p.m. - program lecture at the National World War I Museum, 100 West 26th Street, Kansas City, MO
From North Africa to Southeastern Europe: The fate of the Sephardim in the Holocaust with Dr. Michael Berenbaum professor of Jewish Studies at the American Jewish University.
This program is presented in partnership with the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education and National World War I Museum and is a part of the exhibit lecture series for Discovery and Recovery: Preserving Iraqi Jewish Heritage.

Saturday, August 15 – 4:00 p.m.
Exhibit Closing

Discovery and Recovery: Preserving Iraqi Jewish Heritage in the Concourse Gallery.

Tuesday, August 256:00 reception/6:30 p.m. program
Panel Discussion
Women’s Equality Week: Run Women Run!
This panel discussion will includes a select group of current and former elected office holders who will discuss how and why they ran for public office. In addition, the speakers will offer advice and tips on how to organize a campaign, recruit volunteers, and fundraise. Panelists include former Kansas City (MO) Councilwoman Joanne Collins (R), current state representative Judy Morgan (D), and Rebecca Richardson, president of the Greater Kansas City Women’s Political Caucus, a nonpartisan group that supports women who run for elected office. The panel will be moderated by Dana Perry of the American Association of University Women.  Program presented in partnership with the Greater KC Women’s Political Caucus and the American Association of University Women.

Wednesday, September 96:00 reception/6:30 p.m. program
Author Lecture and Signing
Program tied to All Sewn Up: The Garment Industry Goes to Court exhibit.
Book event with Ann Brownfield and David Jackson authors of We Were Hanging by a Thread.
We Were Hanging by a Thread highlights Kansas City, Missouri's, once world-renowned textile and garment manufacturing industry. It focuses on individuals that designer Ann Brownfield has had acquaintance or first-hand business connections with in her career, and in retirement as co-founder and director of the Historic Kansas City Garment District Museum. This book honors a diverse workforce from native Kansas Citians and minority first-and second-generation Americans—from all backgrounds and countries around the globe—who came to Kansas City for their livelihood. Architectural historians will find the built environment of the Garment District notable. Even barbeque enthusiasts will savor knowing that Henry Perry, "the father of Kansas City-style barbecue," got his start in 1908 from a stand in an alley in this historic neighborhood. Prepare yourself to gain an appreciation for an art form and way of life that is no more.

Wednesday, September 23 – 6:00 reception/6:30 p.m. program
Author Lecture and Signing
The Buffalo Soldiers: Their Epic Story and Major Campaigns by Dr. Debra Sheffer.
This fascinating saga follows the story of the Buffalo Soldiers as they participated in key events in America's history. Sheffer discusses the impetus for the earliest black military service, how that service led to the creation of the Buffalo Soldiers, and how these men—and one woman—continued to serve in the face of epic obstacles. The work celebrates their significant military contributions to the campaigns of the American frontier and other battles, their fighting experiences, and life on the plains. Starting with the American Revolution, the book traces the heroic journey of these legendary servicemen from the period when black Americans first sought full citizenship in exchange for military service to the integration of the military and the dissolution of all-black regiments. Several chapters highlight the special achievements of the 9th and 10th United States Cavalry and the 24th and 25th United States Infantry. The book also features the accomplishments—both of the unit and individuals—of the Buffalo Soldiers in battle and beyond. Program presented in partnership with Park University.

Thursday, October 1 - 6:00 reception/6:30 p.m. film screening
20th Century Civil Rights and Liberties documentary film series and discussion with ASALH.
Free Angela and All Political Prisoners
Film and discussion in recognition of the 45th anniversary of the arrest of Angela Davis, an American political activist, scholar, and author. Davis emerged as a prominent counterculture activist and radical in the 1960s, as a leader of the Communist Party, and had close relations with the Black Panther Party through her involvement in the Civil Rights Movement, although she was never a party member. Her interests included prisoner rights; she founded Critical Resistance, an organization working to abolish the prison-industrial complex. She is a retired professor with the History of Consciousness Department at the University of California-Santa Cruz, and a former director of the university's Feminist Studies department. Davis was arrested, charged, tried, and acquitted of conspiracy in the 1970 armed take-over of a Marin County, California, courtroom in which four persons died. Program presented in partnership with Association for the Study of African American Life and History and the Greater Kansas City Black History Study Group.

Thursday, October 8 - 6:00 reception/6:30 p.m. program
Author Lecture and Signing
The President and the Apprentice: Eisenhower and Nixon, 1952-1961 by Irv Gellman.
More than half a century after Eisenhower left office, the history of his presidency is so clouded by myth, partisanship, and outright fraud that most people have little understanding of how Ike’s administration worked or what it accomplished. We know—or think we know—that Eisenhower distrusted his vice president, Richard Nixon, and kept him at arm’s length; that he did little to advance civil rights; that he sat by as Joseph McCarthy’s reckless anticommunist campaign threatened to wreck his administration; and that he planned the disastrous 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba. None of this is true. The President and the Apprentice reveals a different Eisenhower, and a different Nixon. Ike trusted and relied on Nixon, sending him on many sensitive overseas missions. Eisenhower, not Truman, desegregated the military. Eisenhower and Nixon, not Lyndon Johnson, pushed the Civil Rights Act of 1957 through the Senate. Eisenhower was determined to bring down McCarthy and did so. Nixon never, contrary to recent accounts, saw a psychotherapist, but while Ike was recovering from his heart attack in 1955, Nixon was overworked, overanxious, overmedicated, and at the limits of his ability to function. Gellman is the author of four previous books on American presidents. He is currently at work on a volume on Nixon and Kennedy. Program presented in partnership with the Truman Center at the University of Missouri-Kansas City; the Harry S. Truman Presidential Library; and the Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library.

Thursday, October 15 - 6:00 reception/6:30 p.m. program
Panel Discussion
Diversity and Inclusion: How Does Kansas City Rate?
Speakers include Meg Conger, city of Kansas City, Missouri.; Judy Hellman, Jewish Community Relations Bureau; Stuart Hinds, University of MO-Kansas City/Gay & Lesbian Archives of Mid-America; Arzie Umali, University of MO-Kansas City/Women’s Center; Lewis Diuguid, The Kansas City Star editorial board; and moderated by Bette Tate-Beaver. Program presented in partnership with the American Association of University Women.

Thursday, October 296:00 reception/6:30 p.m. program
Author Discussion
The Country Club District of Kansas City
LaDene Morton will discuss her latest book on Kansas City history, The Country Club District of Kansas City. Morton examines the first 50 years of J.C. Nichols’ visionary development and the period of Nichols’ lifetime where he was singularly influential in creating the community. While the book includes chapters covering the chronological history, and the larger historical context in which the District came to be, the stories about the “community feature” of the District provide the nostalgia. The strength of the District came from Nichols’ insight into how features such as architecture and aesthetics, the schools and churches as institutions, and creating community through creating shared experiences, all played important roles in building the District into what Nichols termed, “America’s Best Residential Section.”

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