National Archives at Kansas City

Location:

National Archives at Kansas City
400 West Pershing Road
Kansas City, MO 64108

WWI App User-Design Workshop for Educators

National Archives at Kansas City Calendar of Events

All activities are free and open to the public unless noted.

Reservations are requested for all programs and workshops by calling 816-268-8010 or emailing kansascity.educate@nara.gov.

Wednesday, September 7 – 6:00 p.m. reception/6:30 p.m. program
Author Lecture and Signing
Harvey Houses of Kansas: Historic Hospitality from Topeka to Syracuse by Rosa Walston Latimer

Starting in Kansas, Fred Harvey’s iconic Harvey House was the first to set the standard for fine dining and hospitality across the rugged Southwest. In 1876, the first of Harvey’s depot restaurants opened in Topeka, followed just a few years later by the first combination hotel and restaurant in Florence. Fred Harvey and the Harvey Girls introduced good food and manners to the land of Bat Masterson, Wyatt Earp and raucous cattle drives. In her third book on the Harvey House legacy, author Rosa Walston Latimer goes back to where it all began in this history of hospitality from the Sunflower State.

Tuesday, September 13 – 6:00 p.m. reception/6:30 p.m. program
Author Panel Discussion
Fides et Labor – 140 Years of Pioneering Education: The Story of Park University

Situated on the edge of the Missouri River and founded in 1875, Park University is a private, non-profit institution with a rich history of providing quality education and service to its students and community. Panelists will discuss how the stories and photos in this new publication trace the last 140 years as the institution grew from a small Presbyterian school with 17 students into a world-class provider of higher education to more than 17,700 students at 40 campuses across the country. Erik Bergrud, Associate Vice President for External Affairs; Carolyn Elwess, University Archivist; and Dr. Timothy Westcott, Professor of History and Associate University Archivist, all from Park University. Moderating will be Christopher Leitch, Community Relations Coordinator, Johnson County (KS) Library. Program with staff and faculty from Park University discussing the 140th anniversary of the university and the book celebrating the rich history of Parkville, Missouri. This program is presented in partnership with Park University Alumni Association.

Thursday, September 15 – 6:00 p.m. reception/6:30 p.m. program
Moderated Discussion
Ike, Harry, and the Constitution

Over 200 years ago, when America’s founding documents were written, the impact of their legacy could not have been envisioned. At times, the Constitution has been amended and altered to fit the needs of a growing country and citizenship. Despite the vast scholarship which has grown around the presidencies of Truman and Eisenhower, and the abundant writing and speaking that both men did about the U.S. Constitution, their views on this important subject are not well known. Ike, Harry and the Constitution will illuminate this aspect of their respective administrations. Dr. Robert Beatty (Washburn University) will moderate a discussion with Dr. James Giglio (Missouri State University) and Dr. Richard Damms (Mississippi State University), who will discuss their research and findings on Truman and Eisenhower from the recently published compilation Presidents and the Constitution: A Living History edited by Ken Gormley. This program is presented in partnership with the Dwight D. Eisenhower Library and Museum; Harry S. Truman Presidential Library and Museum; and the Truman Center at the University of Missouri – Kansas City. Funding for this program has been provided by the William T. Kemper Charitable Trust.

OFFSITE PROGRAM - Tuesday, September 20 - 6:30 p.m. program
Evening Lecture

The National Archives at Kansas City in partnership with the National World War I Museum and Memorial, will host George H. Nash for a lecture titled Herbert Hoover: The Great Humanitarian. This program will be held in the J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum and Memorial, 100 West 26th Street, Kansas City, Missouri. Did you know before Herbert Hoover became the president of the United States, he was known as “The Great Humanitarian,” due to his creation of the Commission of Relief during World War I? Nash, a leading authority and historian of President Herbert Hoover, will discuss how Hoover founded and ran an international organization that fed millions of French and Belgian civilians during the war. Nash is a revered independent scholar who has published widely on Hoover and American political history and was the 2008 recipient of the annual Richard M.
Weaver Prize. More information or make a reservation. This program is presented in partnership with the National World War I Museum and Memorial.

Thursday, September 22– 6:00 p.m. reception/6:30 p.m. program
Author Interview and Signing
Heirlooms by Rachel Hall

Heirlooms begins in the French seaside city of Saint-Malo, in 1939, and ends in the American Midwest in 1989. In these linked stories, the war reverberates through four generations of a Jewish family. Inspired by the author’s family stories as well as extensive research, Heirloomsexplores assumptions about love, duty, memory and truth. Heirlooms won the G. S. Sharat Chandra Prize for Short Fiction from BkMk Press. Angela Elam, producer and host of New Letters on Air, will interview Hall for a broadcast airing later on KCUR 89.3 FM. This program is presented in partnership with the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education; the University of Missouri – Kansas City’s BkMk Press and New Letters on Air; and the University of Missouri-Kansas City’s Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, Department of History, Center for Midwestern Studies, and Graduate Certificate Program in Holocaust Studies.

OFFSITE PROGRAM – Monday, September 26 – 5:30 p.m. reception/6:15 p.m. program
2016 Presidential Debate Watch Party

The National Archives in partnership with the National World War I Museum and Memorial, will host a live screening of the first U.S. presidential debate of 2016. This program will be held in the J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum and Memorial, 100 West 26th Street, Kansas City, Missouri. There are many parallels between 1916 and 2016, including a contentious presidential election. Watch Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton and Republican nominee Donald Trump face-off in the first presidential debate of the 2016 general election season. Join The Modernists (the young friends of the WWI Museum) for a night of complimentary food, drinks, and good company and enjoy this American pastime. This is a ticketed event, cost to attend is $5. More information or purchase a ticket. This program is presented in partnership with the 1840 Vote Project; Consensus; Generation Listen KC; the Young Friends of the Kansas City Public Library; KCUR 89.3; Linking Leaders; and the National World War I Museum and Memorial. Funding has been provided by Hallmark; Lathrop & Gage LLP; Jeannine Strandjord; and the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation.

Thursday, October 27 – 6:00 p.m. reception/6:30 p.m. program
Author Lecture and Signing
Truman, Congress, and Korea: The Politics of America’s First Undeclared War by Dr. Larry Blomstedt

Three days after North Korean premier Kim Il Sung launched a massive military invasion of South Korea on June 24, 1950, President Harry S. Truman responded, dispatching air and naval support to South Korea. Initially, Congress cheered his swift action; but, when China entered the war to aid North Korea, the president and many legislators became concerned that the conflict would escalate into another world war, and the United States agreed to a truce in 1953. The lack of a decisive victory caused the Korean War to quickly recede from public attention. However, its impact on subsequent American foreign policy was profound. In Truman, Congress, and Korea: The Politics of America's First Undeclared War, Blomstedt provides the first in-depth domestic political history of the conflict, from the initial military mobilization, to Congress's failed attempts to broker a cease-fire, to the political fallout in the 1952 election. During the war, President Truman faced challenges from both Democratic and Republican legislators, whose initial support quickly collapsed into bitter and often public infighting. For his part, Truman dedicated inadequate attention to relationships on Capitol Hill early in his term and also declined to require a formal declaration of war from Congress, advancing the shift toward greater executive power in foreign policy. Blomstedt's study explores the changes wrought during this critical period and the ways in which the war influenced US international relations and military interventions during the Cold War and beyond. Program presented in partnership with the Harry S. Truman Presidential Library and Museum and the Truman Center at the University of Missouri – Kansas City.

Tuesday, November 8 – 6:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.
Election Day

The National Archives at Kansas City is a polling site.

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