National Archives at Chicago

Record Groups 58 - 96

This information from the Archival Holdings Guide comprises Record Groups 58 through 96. (Go to the Numerical List of Record Groups)


Record Group 58
Records of the Internal Revenue Service

Administrative History
The Office of the Commissioner of Internal Revenue was established in the Department of the Treasury by an act of July 1, 1862, to help finance the Civil War. Within the Office the agency that collected funds was known as the Bureau of Internal Revenue until 1953 when it was designated the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). The taxes levied during the Civil War were gradually abolished until only taxes on liquor and tobacco remained in 1883. In addition to the taxes on these commodities, the Bureau began collecting a corporation income tax after 1909. With the adoption of the 16th amendment in 1913, the collection of income taxes became one of the Bureau's principal functions. It is now responsible for the administration, assessment, and collection of all internal revenue taxes.

Records Description
Dates
: 1867-1971
Volume: 175 cubic feet
Records of IRS collectors in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin, 1867-1873. They document business and excise taxes and include the name of the owner or proprietor of the business, the type of tax or item being taxed, assessed value, and amount. The records are bound volumes of assessment lists.

Records of IRS collectors in the following collection districts:
  • Chicago, Illinois, 1895-1971
  • Columbus, Ohio, 1906-1919
  • Detroit, Michigan, 1870-1928
  • Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1910-1940
  • Madison, Wisconsin, 1871-1919
  • Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 1878-1919
  • Peoria, Illinois, 1910-1919
  • Springfield, Illinois, 1905-1919
  • Toledo, Ohio, 1899-1919

The records document taxes paid by businesses and individuals and include addresses, amount of income taxed, the article or occupation taxed, amounts assessed and paid, and comments relevant to the process. Some volumes contain inheritance and estate tax records and special lists for banks. For Detroit, there are lists of district officers and employees, dating to 1928. The records are monthly reports.

Finding Aid
Draft inventory.

Related Microfilm Publications
M764
, Internal Revenue Assessment Lists for Illinois, 1862-1866;
M765, Internal Revenue Assessment Lists for Indiana, 1862-1866;
M773, Internal Revenue Assessment Lists for Michigan, 1862-1866;
M774, Internal Revenue Assessment Lists for Minnesota, 1862-1866

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Record Group 72
Records of the Bureau OF Aeronautics

Administrative History
The Bureau of Aeronautics was established in the Department of the Navy by an act of July 12, 1921, to perform aeronautical duties as directed by the Secretary of the Navy. When this bureau was established, functions of the Aircraft Division of the Bureau of Construction and Repair and the Aeronautics Division of the Bureau of Steam Engineering were transferred to it, including responsibility for testing materials, making contracts, and outfitting bases and other shore establishments.

During World War II, Bureau functions were expanded, and emphasis was placed on developing naval aircraft designs; purchasing, construction, and maintaining aircraft and airships; maintaining naval air stations and fleet air bases; and supervising the service, repair, overhaul and salvage of naval aircraft. The Bureau was abolished by an act of August 18, 1959, and its functions transferred to the Bureau of Naval Weapons. They were reassigned in 1966 to the Air, Weapons, and Electronics Systems Commands.

Records Description
Dates
: 1933-1942
Volume: 4 cubic feet
Records of the Inspector of Naval Aircraft, Akron, Ohio. The records document the design, technical development, and construction of airships at Akron's Goodyear Zeppelin Corporation and the Daniel Guggenheim Airship Institute; and the Goodyear Zeppelin Corporation's facilities, organization, and personnel for 1939. They are technical reports including charts, correspondence, graphs, memorandums, and structural test results. Nontextual records include assembly drawings and photographs.

Finding Aid
Box contents list.

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Record Group 75
Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs

Administrative History
An Office of Indian Affairs was established in 1824 within the War Department, which had exercised jurisdiction over relations with Indian tribes since the formation of the Federal Government. The Office operated informally within the War Department until Congress authorized the appointment of a Commissioner of Indian Affairs in 1832. The Office was transferred to the Department of the Interior in 1849. Although commonly called the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), it was not officially designated that until 1947.

The Bureau is responsible for most of the Federal Government's relations with the tribes of Indians that it recognizes. Some groups of Indians, particularly in the Eastern States, have never received official recognition, and other groups ceased to function as cohesive tribes before the establishment of the Federal Government in 1789. The Bureau has only exercised responsibility for Indians living on a recognized reservation or who maintained an affiliation with a recognized tribe. Many persons of Indian descent are not mentioned in any of the Bureau's records because they severed all connection with any tribe.

The Bureau's programs have had an impact on virtually every phase of tribal development and individual Indian life including education, health, land ownership, financial affairs, employment, and legal rights. In 1931, the Bureau assumed jurisdiction over the Indians and Eskimos of Alaska from the Alaska Division of the Office of Education, which had been established in 1885 to administer education and health programs for the natives of Alaska. In 1955, most of the Bureau's health activities, including the operation of Indian Hospitals, were transferred to the Public Health Service.

When it was created in 1824, the Bureau inherited a well-established system of agencies, each of which was responsible for all relations with one or more tribes. Many of these agencies were subordinate to a superintendency which had general responsibility for Indian affairs in a territory or other geographical area.

Although there were numerous changes in agency designations and jurisdictions, this basic organizational structure remained unchanged until superintendencies were abolished in the 1870's and all agents began reporting directly to the Bureau headquarters in Washington, DC. In 1947, area offices were established to exercise supervisory control over agencies and other administrative units (such as schools or irrigation districts) within specific geographic regions. In addition to the agents who were responsible for the day-to-day implementation of Indian policy, the Bureau often sent officials into the field for special purposes. These included treaty commissioners, inspectors, purchasing and disbursing agents, enrolling and allotting agents, and education specialists. Many of the schools that operated on Indian reservations were under the control of a superintendent who was often independent of the agent and sometimes exercised the functions of an agent. There were also a number of non-reservation schools, such as the Chilocco Indian School in Oklahoma, which accepted students from all over the country and were not under the control of any local agent.

Records Description
Dates
: 1869-1973
Volume: 2,296 cubic feet
Records of the following agencies, area offices, and schools:

  • Bad River Agency, Wisconsin, 1887-1958. The Agency supervised the Bad River Band of Chippewas.
  • Carter and Laona Subagencies, Wisconsin, 1910-1933. These subagencies supervised the Rice Lake band of Chippewas and several bands of Potawatomi.
  • Chicago Field Employment Assistance Office, 1951-1967.
  • Chippewa Commission, Minnesota, 1889-1900.
  • Cleveland Field Employment Assistance Office, 1965-1967.
  • Consolidated Chippewa Agency, Minnesota, 1913-1935. The Agency supervised Indians previously assigned to the White Earth, Leech Lake, and Red Lake Agencies.
  • Grand Rapids Agency, Wisconsin, 1900-1926. The agency supervised the Winnebago and Arpin Band of Potawatomi.
  • Great Lakes Agency, Michigan and Wisconsin, 1917-1963. The Agency supervised various bands of Chippewa and Potawatomi Indians.
  • Great Lakes Consolidated Agency, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin, 1889-1963. The Agency supervised various bands of Chippewa, Potawatomi, Winnebago, Stockbridge, Oneida, and Ottawa Indians.
  • Hayward School, Wisconsin, 1894-1934. The school served the Chippewa of the Lac Courte Oreille Reservation.
  • Lac du Flambeau School and Agency, Michigan and Wisconsin, 1892-1949. The agency and school were responsible for the Chippewa and Potawatomi.
  • La Pointe Agency, Minnesota and Wisconsin, 1869-1931. The agency supervised the Bois Fort Band of Chippewa, the Chippewa Indians on the Red Cliff Reservation, and the Chippewa of Lake Superior in Minnesota and Wisconsin.
  • Leech Lake Agency, Minnesota, 1899-1922. The Agency supervised the Leech Lake Pillager, Cass and Winnibigoshish Pillager, White Oak Point, and Red Lake Bands of Chippewa Indians.
  • Mackinac Agency, Mackinaw Agency, and L'Anse Reservation, Michigan, 1895-1927. The agencies, with offices in Baraga and L'Anse, supervised the Chippewa.
  • Menominee Agencies (Green Bay, Keshena, Menominee Mills), Wisconsin, 1879-1962. The agencies supervised the Menominee, Munsee, Oneida, and Stockbridge tribes.
  • Michigan Agency, 1934-1970. The agency is responsible for supervising all Indians in the State.
  • Minneapolis Area Office, 1948-1973.
  • Mt. Pleasant Indian School and Agency, Michigan and Mt. Pleasant Indian School and Agency Student Case Files, 1892-1946. The agency and school supervised Indians in the Lower Peninsula of Michigan, particularly the Chippewa of Saginaw, Swan Creek, and Black River on the Isabella Reservation.
  • Nett Lake Agency, Minnesota, 1908-1917. The Agency was responsible for supervising the Bois Fort Band of Chippewa Indians.
  • Oneida School and Agency, Wisconsin, 1897-1923. The agency and school supervised the Oneida Indians.
  • Red Cliff School and Agency, Wisconsin, 1878-1955. The agency and school supervised the Chippewa Indians.
  • Tama Agency, School and Sanatorium, Iowa, 1885-1947. These organizations served the Sac and Fox Indians.
  • Tomah School and Agency, Iowa, Minnesota, Michigan, and Wisconsin, 1894-1958. The agency and school supervised the Saginaw, Swan Creek, and Black River Chippewa; Munsee; Oneida; Ottawa; Potawatomi; Stockbridge; and Winnebago tribes.
    Tomah Agency, Tomah, Wisconsin,
    Tomah CCC-ID Units, Tomah, Wisconsin,
    Tomah Hospital, Tomah, Wisconsin,
    Tomah Indian Industrial School, Tomah, Wisconsin.
  • White Earth Agency, Minnesota, 1878-1922. The Agency was responsible for supervising various bands of Chippewa Indians.
  • Wittenberg Indian School, Wittenberg, Wisconsin, 1895-1915.

Records submitted by the agent and other field employees document tribal economic, political, and social life; the daily relations between the BIA and the Indians, an agent and his superiors, and officials of other Federal and local government agencies; and the agent's perceptions about the Indians and his duties. Included are annual narrative and statistical reports, and correspondence.

The records document Indians' financial affairs such as annuity payments and isbursements of other funds to tribal members as a result of treaties or congressional legislation. They contain the Indian's name and the amount of money or type of goods received. With tribal censuses and other enrollment records, they document genealogy and tribal demographics. Included are cash reports, ledgers of receipts and disbursements, property returns, and vouchers.

The records document the financial affairs of "restricted Indians," considered incompetent because of their age, degree of Indian blood, or other factors. They concern the collection and disbursement of funds; requests by Indians for money to buy automobiles, clothing, farming equipment, furniture, groceries, livestock, pianos, and many other items; and the determination of heirs and distribution of the estates. Included are probate files, application forms, and related correspondence.

The records document land allotment to individual tribal members, names of eligible tribe members, contested allotments, the dispersal of the tribal domain, protests against the allotment process, sale or leasing of land, and use of tribal resources. Included are lists of eligible members, applications for specific tracts of land, plat maps, lists of eligible members, hearings, and letters (many in the native language) from Indians to their agents.

The records document the operation of schools on reservations, and nonreservation and public schools which Indians attended; school enrollments; and planning and implementation of educational programs. Included are correspondence, employee and faculty rosters, narrative and statistical reports, and individual student files that contain applications for admission, correspondence, and grades.

The records document the impact of changing social and economic conditions as reflected in activities of the Civilian Conservation Corps--Indian Division and other emergency relief programs conducted in the 1930s; agricultural extension projects; health care programs; construction of roads; home demonstration programs; housing; income; irrigation and land management activities; liquor control, suppression of peyote, and other law enforcement activities on reservations; living conditions; and recreation. Included are project files and reports.

The records document tribal governments and provide insight into tribal politics and Indian reaction to the administration of John Collier and to the Wheeler-Howard Act, which restored tribal ownership of land. Included are agendas, minutes, and resolutions of tribal business committees or other elected groups.

Finding Aids
Entries 1060 through 1064, 1075 through 1112, 1148, 1149, 1244 through 1312, and 1371 through 1376 in Edward E. Hill, comp., Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Volume 2: Bureau of Indian Affairs Field Offices and their Records, PI 163 (1965).

See also The Modern Civil Rights Movement: Federal Records in NARA's Great Lakes Region

Related Microfilm Publications
A35, Baker Roll of Eastern Cherokee Indians, 1928 ;
A48-A49 , Durant Roll of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians of Michigan, 1870 ;
M1, Records of the Michigan Superintendency of Indian Affairs, 1814-1851;
M2, Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs, 1848-1873;
M4, Letter Book of the Creek Trading House, 1795-1816;
M5, Records of the Washington Superintendency of Indian Affairs, 1853-1874;
M15, Letters Sent by the Secretary of War Relating to Indian Affairs, 1800-1824;
M16, Letters Sent by the Superintendent of Indian Trade, 1807-1823;
M18, Register of Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, 1824-1880;
M21, Letters Sent by the Office of Indian Affairs, 1824-1881;
M74, Letters of Tench Coxe, Commissioner of the Revenue, Relating to the Procurement of Military, Naval, and Indian Supplies, 1794-1796;
M234, Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, 1824-1881;
M271, Letters Received by the Office of the Secretary of War Relating to Indian Affairs, 1800-1823;
M348, Report Books of the Office of Indian Affairs, 1838-1885;
M574, Special Files of the Office of Indian Affairs, 1807-1904;
M595, Indian Census Rolls, 1884-1940;
M606, Letters Sent by the Indian Division of the Office of the Secretary of the Interior, 1849-1903;
M668, Ratified Indian Treaties, 1722-1869;
M685 , Records Relating to the Enrollment of Eastern Cherokee by Guion Miller, 1908-1910;
M842, Records of the Minnesota Superintendency of Indian Affairs, 1849-1856;
M951, Records of the Wisconsin Superintendency of Indian Affairs, 1836-1848, and the Green Bay Subagency, 1850;
M1011,Superintendent's Annual Narrative and Statistical Reports From Field Jurisdictions of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, 1907-1938;
M1186, Enrollment Cards for the Five Civilized Tribes, 1898-1914;
M1104, Eastern Cherokee Applications of the U.S. Court of Claims, 1906-1909;
M2039 , Durant Roll with Field Notes and Correspondence, 1908 ;
T58, Letters Received by the Superintendent of Indian Trade, 1806-1824;
T494, Documents Relating to the Negotiation of Ratified and Unratified Treaties With Various Indian Tribes, 1801-1869;
T529 ,Final Rolls of Citizens and Freedmen of the Five Civilized Tribes in Indian Territory (as Approved by the Secretary of the Interior on or Before Mar. 4, 1907, With Supplements Dated Sept. 25, 1914);
7RA-23 , Records of the Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes: Creek Rolls, 1857-1859;
7RA-61 , Chilocco School Enrollment Records, 1890-1952 ;
7RA-70 , Index to 1896 Citizenship Cases and Dockets of the Dawes Commission ;
7RA-71 , Index to 1896 Cherokee Roll, Excluding Freedmen ;
7RA-147 , Index to Choctaw "R" Cards ;
7RA-173 , Dawes Enrollment Cards for Identified Mississippi Choctaws ;
7RA-174 , Index to Identified Mississippi Choctaws

Restrictions
Access to some files or portions of documents may be restricted because of privacy concerns.

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Record Group 77
Records of the Office of the Chief of Engineers

Administrative History
The Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, with headquarters at Washington, DC, was a result of orders of April 3, 1818. The military responsibilities of the Office of the Chief of Engineers (OCE) have included producing and distributing Army maps, building roads, planning camps, and constructing and repairing fortifications and other installations. Its civil duties have included maintaining and improving inland waterways and harbors, formulating and executing plans for flood control, operating dams and locks, and approving plans for the construction of bridges, wharves, piers, and other works over navigable waters. Expansion of the OCE's river and harbor improvement work after the Civil War necessitated the establishment of district offices throughout the United States. The engineer officer in charge of each district reported directly to the Chief of Engineers until 1888 when engineer divisions were created with administrative jurisdiction over the district offices.

Records Description
Dates
: 1832-1979
Volume: 2,034 cubic feet
Records of the following divisions:

  • Central, 1901-1923
  • Great Lakes, 1908-1924
  • North Central, 1875-1906
  • Northwest, 1888-1906
  • Ohio River, 1889-1978
  • Upper Mississippi Valley, 1912-1942 and districts:
  • Chicago, 1832-1978
  • Cincinnati, 1838-1945
  • Detroit, 1849-1960
  • Duluth, 1907-1952
  • Louisville, 1896-1944
  • Milwaukee, 1867-1955
  • Rock Island, 1866-1979
  • St. Paul, 1836-1964
  • Zanesville, 1934-1949; and depots:
  • Granite City Engineer and Army Depot, Illinois;
  • Marion Engineer Depot, Ohio

The growth of business and industry in the Midwest and the consequent need for transportation to eastern markets prompted the Corps of Engineers to examine water routes to complement or extend natural rivers. The records document the construction and maintenance of locks and dams and harbor improvements and reflect the development of commerce and industry around the Great Lakes region, the Upper Mississippi Valley, and to a lesser degree, the Ohio Valley; potential canal routes; a possible canal connecting Lake Erie and the Ohio River, including data concerning industries along the route, goods and commodities to be carried, and interaction with businesses, organizations, and local governments; an artificial waterway in Illinois to link Lake Michigan with the Mississippi River; the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal and other components of the Illinois Waterway; and flood control analyses for river systems in the Upper Mississippi Valley. Included are correspondence, field books, journals, reconnaissance and scouting reports, and statistical reports in bound volumes. Nontextual records include charts, engineering maps and drawings, and photographs.

Finding Aids
Draft inventory.
Entries 348 through 358 in Elizabeth Bethel and Maizie H. Johnson, comps., Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the Textual Records of the Office of the Chief of Engineers, NM 19 (1964).
Entry 356A in Maizie H. Johnson, comp., Supplement to Preliminary Inventory NM 19, Textual Records of the Office of the Chief of Engineers, Part I, NM 78 (1967).
For St. Paul District, examinations and surveys, 1907-1946, and survey report files relating to miscellaneous rivers, 1921-1959: box contents lists.
For Granite City and Marion depots: box contents lists.

Related Microfilm Publications
M65, Letters Sent by the Office of the Chief of Engineers Relating to Internal Improvements, 1824-1830;
M66, Letters Sent by the Topographical Bureau of the War Department and by Successor Divisions in the Office of the Chief of Engineers, 1829-1870;
M1108, Harrison-Bundy Files Relating to the Development of the Atomic Bomb, 1942-1946;
M1109, Correspondence ("Top Secret") of the Manhattan Engineer District, 1942-1946;
A1218, Manhattan Engineer District History

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Record Group 79
Records of the National Park Service

Administrative History
The National Park Service was established in the Department of the Interior by an act of August 25, 1916. It supervises national parks, monuments, historic parks, memorials, parkways, recreation areas, and seashores and is responsible for the promotion and regulation of their use. It establishes and enforces regulations for use, protects parks from fire, regulates concession operators, investigates and recommends proposed new areas, acquires land, and constructs and maintains roads, trails, and buildings. It also engages in research and educational work such as managing guided tours and lectures, marking nature trails, maintaining museums and libraries, and preparing publications and studies in history, archeology, natural history, and wildlife.

Records Description
Dates
: 1940-1999
Volume: 8 cubic feet

Records of the following sites:

  • Isle Royale National Park, Houghton, Michigan, 1940-1962;
  • Hopewell Culture National Historical Park (formerly Mound City Group National Monument), Chillicothe, Ohio, 1946-1999.

The records document park administration and operations. They are correspondence and subject files. Nontextual records include a few architectural drawings, maps, and photographs.

Finding Aids
Folder title lists.

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Record Group 83
Records of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics

Administrative History
The Bureau of Agricultural Economics was established in the Department of Agriculture on July 1, 1922. Until 1939, it conducted studies and disseminated information relating to agricultural production, crop estimates, marketing, finance, labor, and other agricultural problems, and administered several regulatory statutes. In 1939, marketing functions were transferred to the Agricultural Marketing Service and most land-utilization work was transferred to the Soil Conservation Service. In 1953, it was abolished and its functions were transferred to the Agricultural Research Service and the Agricultural Marketing Service. The regional offices of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics were an outgrowth of those of the Farm Security Administration. When the overall planning functions of the Department of Agriculture were consolidated in the Bureau in 1938, personnel who had been engaged in land use planning work in the Farm Security Administration were transferred to the Bureau, and regional offices were established. In some cases, records of regional offices of the Farm Security Administration, the National Resources Committee, or the Land Utilization Division of the Resettlement Administration were interfiled with those of the Bureau's regional offices. The regional offices were abolished on June 30, 1946.

Records Description
Dates
: 1935-1946
Volume: 5 cubic feet
Records of Frank Hardy, Regional Farm Management Leader, North Central Regional Office, Milwaukee. The records document farm management work in the field. Included are charts, correspondence, and reports. Nontextual records include maps. See RG 355 for related records.

Finding Aid
Entry 267 in Vivian Wiser, comp., Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics, PI 104 (1958).

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Record Group 85
Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service

Administrative History
The Office of Superintendent of Immigration was established in the Department of the Treasury by an act of March 3, 1891, and was designated a bureau in 1895 with responsibility for administering the alien contract-labor laws. In 1903, it became part of the Department of Commerce and Labor and in 1906 was designated the Bureau of Immigration and Naturalization with the addition of functions relating to naturalization. In 1913, it was transferred to the Department of Labor as two separate bureaus of Immigration and of Naturalization, which were reunited by Executive order on June 10, 1933, to form the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). The INS, which became part of the Department of Justice in 1940, administers laws relating to admission, exclusion, deportation, and naturalization of aliens; patrols U.S. borders; and supervises naturalization work in designated Federal courts.

Records Description
Dates
: 1840-1950
Volume: 346 cubic feet
Records of the district offices in Chicago (1898-1940) and St. Paul (1906-1942). The records relate to immigration investigations of individuals of Chinese ancestry and are based on enforcement of the Chinese Exclusion Acts, 1882-1943. They are case files containing biographical information and correspondence. See RG 21 and RG 527 for related records.

Records of Cook County and Chicago, 1871-1906. Records created by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) in the late 1930's. The records are "dexigraph" copies of naturalization declarations, petitions, dated 1871-1906, from Cook County and Chicago.

Records of District 9 (northern Illinois, including Chicago and Cook County; southern and eastern Wisconsin; eastern Iowa; and northwest Indiana), 1840-1950. The records document individuals naturalized in county and Federal courts and consist of a Soundex card index. (Records of Cook County date from 1871 because of a fire in that year.) See RG 21 and RG 36 for related records.

Finding Aids
Draft inventory.

List of Chinese Exclusion Case Files for District No. 9, Chicago, 1898-1940 (RG 85)

List of Chinese Exclusion Case Files for District No. 10, St. Paul, 1906-1942 (RG 85)

Attention All or part of these records are stored offsite. To view these records, please contact the Archives in advance, prior to visiting us.

Related Microfilm Publications
M237, Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1897;
M261 , Index to Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1846;
M575, Copies of Lists of Passengers Arriving at Miscellaneous Ports on the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts and at Ports on the Great Lakes, 1820-1873;
M1066, Registers of Vessels Arriving at the Port of New York, New York, From Foreign Ports, 1789-1919;
M1285, Soundex Index to Naturalization Petitions for the United States District and Circuit Courts, Northern District of Illinois, and Immigration and Naturalization Service District 9, 1840-1950;
M1357, Index to Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Galveston, Texas, 1896-1906;
M1358, Index to Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Galveston, Texas, 1906-1951;
M1359, Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Galveston, Texas, 1896-1951;
M1371, Registers and Indexes for Passport Applications, 1810-1906;
M1461, Soundex Index to Canadian Border Entries through the St. Albans, Vermont, District, 1895-1924;
M1462, Alphabetical Index to Canadian Border Entries through Small Ports in Vermont, 1895-1924;
M1463, Soundex Index to Entries into the St. Albans, Vermont, District through Canadian Pacific and Atlantic Ports, 1924-1952;
M1465, Manifests of Passengers Arriving in the St. Albans, Vermont, District through Canadian Pacific Ports, 1929-1949;
M1478, Card Manifests (Alphabetical) of Individuals Entering through the Port of Detroit, Michigan, 1906-54;
M1479, Passenger and Alien Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at the Port of Detroit, Michigan, 1946-57;
M1503, Index and Manifests of Alien Arrivals at Roman, Texas, March 1928-May 1955;
M1754, Nonstatistical Manifests and Statistical Index Cards of Aliens Arriving at Eagle Pass, Texas, June 1905-November 1929 ;
M2005, Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at Ashland, Wisconsin, August 1922-October 1954;
M2008, Lists of Aliens Arriving at Laredo, Texas, July 1903-June 1907, via the Mexican Railroad or the Laredo Foot Bridge;
M2016 , Alphabetical Index of Alien Arrivals at Eagle, Hyder, Ketchikan, Nome, and Skagway, Alaska, June 1906-August 1946;
M2017 , Lists of Aliens Arriving at Skagway (White Pass), Alaska, October 1906-November 1934 ;
M2032 , Passenger Lists of European Immigrants Arriving at Vera Cruz, Mexico, 1921-1923, and Related Correspondence;
M2041, Alien Arrivals at Eagle Pass, Texas, July 1928-June 1953 ;
M2045, Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at Mnitowoc, Wisconsin, 1925-1956;
M2064, Alphabetical Manifest Cards of Alien and Citizen Arrivals at Fort Fairfield, Maine, ca. 1909-April 1953;
T458, Subject Index to Correspondence and Case Files of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, 1903-1952;
T519, Index to Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, June 16, 1897-June 30, 1902.
T520 , Index (Soundex) to Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Baltimore, Maryland, 1897-July 1952 ;
T521 , Index to Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Boston, Massachusetts, January 1, 1902-June 30, 1906 ;
T527 , Index to Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New Orleans, Louisiana, 1853-1899 ;
T617 , Index to Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Boston, Massachusetts, July 1, 1906-December 31, 1920 ;
T618 , Index to Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New Orleans, Louisiana, 1900-1952 ;
T621 , Index (Soundex) to Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, July 1, 1902-December 31, 1943;
T715 , Passenger and Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at the Port of New York, 1897-1957;
T1219, State Department Transcripts of Passenger Lists, ca. October 1819-ca. December 1832;
A3371, Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Knights Key, Florida, February 1908-January 1912;
A3377, Manifests of Alien Arrivals at Ajo, Lukeville, and Sonoyta (Sonoita), Arizona, January 1919-December 1952, and at Los Ebanos, Texas, December 1950-May 1955;
A3381, Register of Federal Court Cases Related to Chinese-Americans and Chinese Immigrants Arriving at, or Departing from, San Francisco, California, ca. 1883-ca. 1916, and Head Tax Cards of Alien Seamen Examined at San Francisco, California, 1921-1924;
A3384, Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at Two Harbors, Minnesota, August 1929-October 1956;
A3386, Manifests of Alien and Citizen Arrivals at Babb, Montana, June 1928-October 1956;
A3391, Indexes to Vessels Arriving (1852-1948) at, and Departing (1900-1949) from, Honolulu, Hawaii;
A3393, Index to Manifests of Permanent and Statistical Alien Arrivals at Laredo, Texas, December 1929-April 1955;
A3394, Passenger Lists of Vessels and Airplanes Arriving at Port Everglades, Florida, February 1932-May 1951;
A3396, Index to Manifests of Permanent and Statistical Alien Arrivals at El Paso, Texas, July 1924-July 1952;
A3397, Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at Green Bay, Wisconsin, October 1925-November 1969;
A3398, Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at Aransas Pass and Port Aransas, Texas, 1912-1921 and 1959-1965;
A3399, Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, August 1922-December 1956, and Records of Selected Airplane Passengers, 1956-1963;
A3400, Manifests of Alien Arrivals at International Falls, Baudette, Duluth, Mineral Center, Pigeon River, Pine Creek, Roseau, and Warroad, Minnesota, January 1907-December 1952;
A3401, Manifests of Alien Arrivals at Eastport, Fort Kent, Lubec, and Madawaska, Maine, ca. 1906-December 1952;
A3402, Manifests of Alien Arrivals at Newport, Vermont, ca. 1906-June 1924;
A3403, Manifests of Alien and Selected U.S. Citizen Arrivals at Anacortes, Danville, Ferry, Laurier, Lyden, Marcus, Metaline Falls, Northport, Oroville, Port Angeles, and Sumas, Washington;
A3404, Index to Passenger Arrivals in the U.S. Virgin Islands, ca. 1906-ca. 1947;
A3405, Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at Ashtabula and Conneaut, Ohio, 1952-1974;
A3407, Index to Filipino Passengers Arriving at Honolulu, Hawaii, ca. 1900-ca. 1952;
A3408, Registers of Japanese, Filipinos, and Hawaiians Held for Boards of Special Inquiry at San Francisco, California, September 1928-February 1942;
A3409, Passenger and Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at (1948-1972) and Departing from (1960-1968) Ogdensburg, New York;
A3410, Index to Passengers, Not Including Filipinos, Arriving at Honolulu, Hawaii, ca. 1900-ca. 1952;
A3411, Index to Filipino Contract Laborers and Their Wives and Children Arriving at Honolulu, Hawaii, 1946;
A3413, Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at Escanaba, Michigan, May 1946-November 1956;
A3414, Passenger Lists of Chinese Arrivals at Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, January 1906-June 1912;
A3415, Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at Ohio Ports of Fairport (1952-1957), Huron (1955-1956), Lorain (1952-1965), Marblehead (1955), and Sandusky (1955-1958);
A3416, Manifests of Alien Arrivals at Portal, North Dakota, 1915-1921;
A3418, Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at Algonac, Marine City, Marysville, and Roberts Landing, Michigan, May 1937-January 1957;
A3420, Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at Sodus Point, New York, 1945-1957;
A3421, Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at DeTour, Michigan, 1946-1956;
A3423, Passenger and Crew Lists of Airplanes Arriving at Brownsville, Texas, January 1943-September 1964;
A3424, Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at Robbinston, Maine, August 1947-June 1954;
A3427, Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at Rockland, Maine, January 1955-May 1969;
A3429, Manifests of Alien Arrivals at Algonac, Marine City, Roberts Landing, Saint Clair,and Sault Sainte Marie, Michigan, 1903-1955;
A3430, Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at Alpena, Bay City, Mackinac Island, Rogers City, Saginaw, and Saint Clair, Michigan, June 1945-June 1966;
A3431, Nonstatistical Manifests of Temporary Alien Arrivals at Laredo, Texas, July 1908-February 1912;
A3432, Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at Hancock, Isle Royale, Marquette, Menominee, and Sault Sainte Marie, Michigan, January 1946-January 1957;
A3433, Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at Grand Haven, Manistee, Muskegon, and South Haven, Michigan, May 1948-December 1956;
A3441, Manifests of Alien Arrivals at Port Huron, Michigan, February 1902-December 1952;
A3443, Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at Port Huron, Michigan, October 1929-January 1957;
A3444, Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at Baudette, Grand Marais, International Falls, Ranier, and Warroad, Minnesota, 1946-1956;
A3445, Land Border Entries and Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Vancouver and Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, January 1894-February 1905;
A3446, Lists of Chinese Passengers Arriving at Vancouver and Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, June 1929-January 1941;
A3447, Manifests of Alien Arrivals at Chief Mountain, Cut Bank, Del Bonita, Gateway, Great Falls, and Roosville, Montana, 1923-1956, and of Alien Departures from Great Falls, Montana, 1944-1945;
A3448, Manifests of Alien Arrivals at Havre, Loring, Orpheim, Raymond, Turner, Westby, and White Tail, Montana, 1924-1956;
A3449, Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at Rouses Point and Waddington, New York, 1954-1956;

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Record Group 87
Records of the U.S. Secret Service

Administrative History
The Secret Service was organized in 1865 within the Department of the Treasury. Its primary responsibilities have been to combat counterfeiting, alteration, and forgery of the currency, and to protect the President and Vice President, their family members and presidential and vice presidential candidates. Until 1908, the Secret Service also conducted special investigations for other Government agencies, both within and outside the Department of the Treasury.

Records Description
Dates
: 1886-1924
Volume: 1 cubic foot
Records of the Indiana District Office, Indianapolis. The records relate to administration and investigations. They are correspondence.

Finding Aid
Folder title list.

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Record Group 90
Records of the Public Health Service, 1912-1968

Administrative History

The Public Health Service, originally called the Marine Hospital Service, has its origins in an act of July 16, 1798, which authorized hospitals for the care of sick and disabled American merchant seamen. The scope of its activities was greatly expanded by subsequent legislation, and it became part of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare in 1955 after having been part of the Department of the Treasury from 1798 to 1939 and the Federal Security Agency from 1939 to 1953.

The Public Health Service operates marine hospitals, hospitals for specific diseases, medical facilities for Federal penal institutions, quarantine and health stations, and research institutions and laboratories. It conducts research in the cause, prevention, and control of disease and disseminates health information.

Records Description
Dates
: 1870-1928
Volume: 12 cubic feet
Records of the Cleveland Marine Hospital. The records document administration, health care, individual patient treatment, and the relationship between State and Federal health agencies. Included are administrative correspondence, clinical records, and patient registers.

Finding Aid
Draft inventory.

Restrictions
Access to some files or portions of documents may be restricted because of privacy concerns.

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Record Group 92
Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General

Administrative History
In 1818, Congress created a Quartermaster's Department under a single Quartermaster General to ensure an efficient system of supply and accountability of Army officers who were responsible for monies or supplies. At various times, the Quartermasters had authority over procurement and distribution of supplies, pay, transportation, and construction. After a number of changes in functions and command relationships, Congress authorized a Quartermaster Corps in 1912 and designated its chief the Quartermaster General in 1914. The Corps was responsible for the operation of a number of general supply depots and subdepots throughout the United States. The Office of the Quartermaster General was abolished in 1962.

Records Description
Dates
: 1863-1960
Volume: 185 cubic feet
Records of the following depots:

  • Camp Custer, Michigan, 1916-1917
  • Chicago Quartermaster Depot, Illinois, 1891-1953
  • Cincinnati Quartermaster Depot, Ohio, 1863-1865
  • Columbus General and Army Depot, Ohio, 1917-1950
  • Columbus Depot, Ohio, 1934-1960
  • Fort Sheridan, Illinois, 1929-1939
  • Jeffersonville Quartermaster Depot, Indiana, 1864-1958
  • Louisville Depot, Kentucky, 1878-1879
  • Motor Transit Corps Depot, Chicago, Illinois, 1919-1920
  • Quartermaster Market Center System, Chicago, Illinois, 1941-1950
  • St. Paul Quartermaster Depot, Minnesota, 1875, 1881-1901
  • U.S. Army Reserve Depot, East Columbus, Ohio 1917-1920

The records relate to administration, organizational history, and research and development. Included are charts, correspondence, memorandums, newsletters, orders, and reports. Nontextual records include photographs.

Finding Aids
Draft inventory.
Entries 1982, 1983, and part of 1994 in Maizie H. Johnson, comp., Preliminary Inventory of the Textual Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General, Part I, NM 81 (1967).
Entries 2132 through 2138, 2466, and 2468 through 2470 in Maizie H. Johnson, comp., Preliminary Inventory of the Textual Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General, Part II, NM 85 (1967).

See also The Modern Civil Rights Movement: Federal Records in NARA's Great Lakes Region

Related Microfilm Publications
M918, Register of Confederate Soldiers, Sailors, and Citizens Who Died in Federal Prisions and Military Hospitals in the North, 1861-1865;
M1845, Card Records of Headstones Provided for Deceased Union Civil War Veterans, ca. 1879-ca. 1903;
M2014, Burial Registers for Military Posts, Camps, and Stations, 1768-1921.

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Record Group 94
Records of the Adjutant General's Office, 1780's -1917

Administrative History
In 1775, the Continental Congress appointed an Adjutant General of the Continental Army. After 1783 no further provision was made for such an officer until an act of March 5, 1792, provided for an adjutant who was also to do the work of inspector. An act of March 3, 1813, established an Adjutant General's Department and an Inspector General's Department under one head, the Adjutant and Inspector General. The two departments were made separate entities by an act of March 2, 1821. In April 1904, the Adjutant General's Office (AGO) and the Records and Pension Office of the War Department were united to form the Military Secretary's Office, but the Adjutant General was not included in this union of the two offices. In March 1907, Congress restored the AGO.

The AGO functioned under the direction of the Secretary of War until the creation of the General Staff in 1903, when the AGO came under the general supervision of the Chief of Staff. When the War Department was reorganized in 1942, the AGO was placed under the supervision of the Commanding General, Services of Supply (later designated Army Service Forces). With the dissolution of this organization in June 1946, the AGO was placed under the General Staff. After the War Department became the Department of the Army in 1947, the Adjutant General came under the direct supervision and control of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel.

The AGO has been charged with matters relating to command, discipline, and administration, and has had the duties of recording, authenticating, and communicating the Secretary's orders, instructions, and regulations to troops and individuals in the Army. The AGO chiefly handled Army orders, correspondence, and other records, and it received final custody of virtually all records concerned with the Military Establishment, including personnel of the Army and discontinued commands, noncurrent holdings of the bureaus of the War Department, and special collections.

The records of the AGO include those of the Record and Pension Office. In order to consolidate in one place all records relating to Regulars and Volunteers, orders, muster rolls, returns, and other military records were brought together to form the Records and Pension Division of the War Department in July 1889 which existed separately until 1904. This division was charged with the custody of the military and hospital records and the transaction of War Department business with them.

Records Description
Dates
: 1905-1912
Volume: 2 cubic feet
Records of the post hospital, Fort Wayne, Michigan. The records document administration and medical treatment. Included are financial statements, reports, requisitions, and treatment sheets.

Finding Aid
Entry 554 in Elizabeth Bethel and Lucille H. Pendell, comps., Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the Adjutant General's Office, 1784-1947, PI 17 (1949).

Attention All or part of these records are stored offsite. To view these records, please contact the Archives in advance, prior to visiting us.

Related Microfilm Publications
M233, Register of Enlistments in the U.S. Army, 1798-1914;

M589, Index to Compiled Service Records of Volunteer Union Soldiers Who Served With United States Colored Troops

M594, Compiled Records Showing Service of Military Units in Volunteer Union Organizations(rolls 204-217 only, relating to regiments of the U.S. Colored Troops.)

M872, Index to Compiled Service Records of Volunteer Soldiers Who Served During the Philippine Insurrection

M1523, Proceedings of U.S.Army Courts-Martial and Military Commissions of Union Soldiers Executed by U.S. Military Authorities, 1861-1866

M1659, Records of the Fifty-Fourth Massachusetts Infantry Regiment (Colored), 1863-1865

M1747, Index to War of 1812 Prisoners of War

M2019, Records Relating to War of 1812 Prisoners of War

M2035, Selected Military Service and Pension Records Relating to Ulysses S. Grant

Restrictions
Access to some files or portions of documents may be restricted because of privacy concerns.

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Record Group 95
Records of the Forest Service

Administrative History
In 1881, a Division of Forestry was established in the Department of Agriculture. It became the Forest Service in 1905 when it assumed responsibility for the administration of forest reserves from the Department of the Interior. From 1933 to 1942, the Service supervised a large part of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) work program.

The Service is responsible for promoting the conservation and best use of national forests and grasslands through development of the National Forest System, cooperating with administrators of State and private forests, and conducting forest and range research programs.

Records Description
Dates
: 1933-2000
Volume: 133 cubic feet
Records of the following operations:

  • Chequamegon National Forest, Park Falls, Wisconsin, 1967-1969;
  • Eastern Regional Office (Region 9), Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 1912-1981;
  • Forest Product Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin, 1993-1998;
  • Huron-Manistee National Forests, Cadillac, Michigan, 1972-1977, 1994;
  • Nicolet National Forest, Rhinelander, Wisconsin, 1967-1970;
  • North Central Field Office (Region 9), Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 1962-1964, 1976-1977;
  • North Central Research Station, St. Paul, Minnesota, 1963-2000;
  • Northeastern Forest Experiment Station, Delaware, Ohio, 1954-1960, 1994-1997;
  • Ottawa National Forest, Ironwood, Michigan, 1960-1974, 1977;
  • Publications Group, Delaware, Ohio, 1982-1994;
  • Shawnee National Forest, Harrisburg, Illinois, 1972-1978;
  • Superior National Forest, Duluth, Minnesota, 1969-1975.

The records document Civilian Conservation Corps camps, 1933-1942; rubber production from dandelions, 1942-1946; building, sanitation and water projects, regulations and directives relating to recreational use of forests, forest boundaries, pesticide use, timber,and the development and use of forest resources. The records are articles, contracts, correspondence, press releases, publications, reports, and studies. The records of the Eastern Regional Office includes a historic photograph collection of 5,499 images. Nontextual records include architectural and engineering drawings and photographs.

Finding Aids
Folder title lists.

For Historic Photograph Collection, database.

Harold T. Pinkett, comp., Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the Forest Service, PI 18 (1949).

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Record Group 96
Records of the Farmers Home Administration

Administrative History
The Farmers Home Administration (FHA) was established in the Department of Agriculture by an act of August 14, 1946, to succeed the Farm Security Administration (FSA), which had been established in 1937. The FSA succeeded the Resettlement Administration, which had been established in 1935 to administer rural rehabilitation and land programs begun in 1933 under the Subsistence Homesteads Division of the Department of the Interior and the Federal Emergency Relief Administration.

The FHA provides small farmers with credit to construct or repair homes, improve farming operations, or become farm owners, and gives individual guidance in farm and home management.

Records Description
Dates
: 1934-1947
Volume: 215 cubic feet
Records of regional offices in Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin (Region 2); and Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Missouri, and Ohio (Region 3). The records relate to farm families' assets, farm ownership, income, expenses, food consumption, production, and resettlement. A study of farms in southeast Missouri contains a 1937 report, "Rich Land-Poor People," relating to general economic, health, and social conditions in seven counties and preliminary reports concerning education, religion, social services, and trade. Included are correspondence, case files, project files, and studies.

Finding Aids
Draft inventory.
Entries 46 through 49, 51 through 55, and 133 in Virgil E. Baugh and Stanley W. Brown, comps., Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the Farmers Home Administration, PI 118 (1959).

Farm Ownership Case Files for Region 2, for Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin, 1937-1946 (RG 96)

Farm Ownership Case Files, Region 3, for Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Missouri, and Ohio, 1937-1946 (RG 96)

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