The National Archives at Boston

Guide to Archival Holdings at NARA's Northeast Region, Waltham (Boston)


Record Group 52
Records of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery

Administrative History
The Bureau of Medicine and Surgery was created by an act of Congress of August 31, 1842, which abolished the Board of Navy Commissioners and established the bureau system in the Department of the Navy. Until it was abolished October 1, 1982, by realignment directive of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, the functions of the Bureau included the care of the sick and injured of the Navy; the administration of naval dispensaries and hospitals; the medical examination of prospective officers and enlisted men and of naval personnel seeking examinations or ordered to undergo them for various administrative purposes; and the practice of preventive naval medicine, including inspections of ships and stations to determine the degree of adequacy of food, water supply, arrangements for heat and air, cleanliness, and related factors of health. See RG 181 for related records.

Records Description
Dates: 1865-92
Volume: 3 cubic feet

Records of the U.S. Naval Hospital, Portsmouth (New Hampshire) Navy Yard. The records relate to the admission, subsistence, treatment, and discharge of patients; physical examinations for new recruits and disability verification; and property and supply requirements. Included are correspondence and reports.

Finding Aids
Draft inventory.

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Record Group 57
Records of the U.S. Geological Survey

Administrative History
The Geological Survey was established in the Department of the Interior by an act of March 3,1879, providing for the "classification of the public lands and the examination of the geological structure, mineral resources, and products of the public domain." An act of September 5, 1962, expanded this authorization to examinations outside the public domain, while topographical mapping and chemical and physical research were authorized by an act of October 2, 1888. The Survey's chief functions are to survey, investigate, and conduct research on the Nation's topography, geology, and mineral and water resources; classify land according to mineral composition and water power resources; furnish engineering supervision for power permits and Federal Power Commission licenses; supervise naval petroleum reserves and mineral leasing operations on public and Indian lands; and disseminate data relating to these activities. See RG 48, RG 77, RG 90, RG 114, RG382, and RG 414 for related records.

Records Description
Dates: 1942-55
Volume: 3 cubic feet

Records of the Branch of Regional Geology in New England, formerly a part of the Survey's Conservation Division. The records document the Survey's role in the New England New York Inter-Agency Committee (NENYIAC). The committee, a coalition of experts, was established in 1950 to formulate an overall plan for the development, use, and conservation of land, water, and related natural resources in New England and parts of New York. Nontextual records include annotated topographical maps of New York and New England relating to location of potential dam sites and to a mineral resources study prepared in the early 1950s; strategic minerals investigation maps for Maine, 1942-45; and geological maps showing mineral deposits, mostly in western Massachusetts, prepared under a cooperative project with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Public Works. Annotations on the maps show sources of information, such as published reports, articles, and previous surveys, as well as names and owners of mines, quarries, brickyards, and sand and gravel pits.

Other records documenting the Survey's role in NENYIAC include agendas, correspondence, membership lists, minutes, and reports, 1950-55.

Finding Aids
  • Draft inventory.
  • Lists of maps and folder titles.

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Record Group 58
Records of the Internal Revenue Service

Administrative History
The Office of the Commissioner of Internal Revenue was established in the Department of the Treasury by an act of July 1, 1862, to help finance the Civil War. Within the Office the agency that collected funds was known as the Bureau of Internal Revenue until 1953 when it was designated the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). The taxes levied during the Civil War were gradually abolished until only taxes on liquor and tobacco remained in 1883. In addition to the taxes on these commodities, the Bureau began collecting a corporation income tax after 1909. With the adoption of the 16th amendment in 1913, the collection of income taxes became one of the Bureau's principal functions. It is now responsible for the administration, assessment, and collection of all internal revenue taxes.

Records Description
Dates: 1866-1918
Volume: 108 cubic feet

Records of IRS collectors in:
  • Connecticut, 1867-1874;
  • Maine, 1867-1874;
  • Massachusetts, 1866-74, 1900-04, 1910-17;
  • New Hampshire, 1867-1874;
  • Rhode Island, 1867-1873;
  • Vermont, 1867-1874.
For each town in these States the records show the name of taxpayer (individuals and corporations), article or occupation taxed, and amount assessed and collected. The records are monthly and annual assessment lists.

Records of IRS collectors in Massachusetts including miscellaneous volumes relating to abatements, claims, and legacies, 1899-1918.

Finding Aids
Box contents list.

Related Microfilm Publications
M758, Internal Revenue Assessment Lists for Connecticut, 1862-1866;
M770, Internal Revenue Assessment Lists for Maine, 1862-1866;
M780, Internal Revenue Assessment Lists for New Hampshire, 1862-1866;
M788, Internal Revenue Assessment Lists for Rhode Island, 1862-1866;
M792, Internal Revenue Assessment Lists for Vermont, 1862-1866.

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Record Group 69
Records of the Work Projects Administration

Administrative History
The Work Projects Administration (known as the Works Progress Administration until July 1, 1939) was established May 6, 1935, with responsibility for the Government's work-relief program. It succeeded the Federal Emergency Relief Administration (FERA) and the Civil Works Administration (CWA), both established in 1933. On July 1, 1939, the WPA was made a part of the Federal Works Agency. When the WPA was officially abolished June 30, 1943, the Division for Liquidation of the Work Projects Administration was set up in the Federal Works Agency and functioned until June 30, 1944.

The WPA operated at four organizational levels--the central administration in Washington, DC; regional offices; State administrations; and district offices. Except for certain Federally sponsored projects, State and local governments helped finance and supervise WPA work projects. See RG 119 for related records.

Records Description
Dates: 1934-43
Volume: 28 cubic feet

Records of the Massachusetts State Office. The records relate to administration of the WPA in Massachusetts, and the restoration of the Customs House, Salem, Massachusetts (under the sponsorship of the National Park Service from 1938 to 1941.) Included are bulletins, circulars, correspondence, directives, handbooks, and reports. Nontextual records include a series of 11 linoleum block prints by artist Stanley Scott, depicting historical scenes in Boston.

Records of the Professional and Service Division. The records document the work of the division and were prepared for "This Work Pays Your Community Week", May 1940. The records are scrapbooks including ephemera, newspaper articles and clippings, proclamations, reports, and scripts and speeches.

Finding Aids
Draft inventory.

Related Microfilm Publications
T935, Index to Reference Cards for WPA Project Files, 1935-37 (Massachusetts only);
T936, Index to Reference Cards for WPA Project Files, 1938 (Massachusetts only);
T937, Index to Reference Cards for WPA Project Files, 1939-42 (Massachusetts only).

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Record Group 71
Records of the Bureau of Yards and Docks

Administrative History
The Bureau of Yards and Docks in 1862 replaced the Bureau of Naval Yards and Docks, established in the Department of the Navy by an act of August 31, 1842. Bureau functions included the design, construction, and maintenance of all naval public works and utilities, such as dry docks, marine railways, shipbuilding ways, harbor structures, storage facilities, power plants, heating and lighting systems, and buildings at shore establishments. The Bureau also operated power plants, maintained public works and utilities at shore establishments, and obtained real estate for Navy use. At advanced bases and in combat areas Bureau work was performed by construction battalions (Seabees). A Department of Defense reorganization order of March 9, 1966, abolished the Bureau, and the Secretary of the Navy transferred most of its functions to the Naval Facilities Engineering Command. See RG 181 for related records.

Records Description
Dates: 1833-1921
Volume: 5 cubic feet

Records of the following sites:
  • Boston Navy Yard, 1833-34, 1836-43, 1849-50;
  • New London Experimental Station, 1919;
  • New London Submarine Base, 1920-21;
  • Portsmouth Navy Yard, 1838-1851.
The records document daily events, including weather conditions, type and number of personnel, and work assigned and accomplished. They are logbooks.

Finding Aids
Entry 91 in Richard C. Wood, comp., Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the Bureau of Yards and Docks, PI 10 (1948).

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Record Group 77
Records of the Office of the Chief of Engineers

Administrative History
The Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, with headquarters at Washington, DC, was a result of orders of April 3, 1818. The military responsibilities of the Office of the Chief of Engineers (OCE) have included producing and distributing Army maps, building roads, planning camps, and constructing and repairing fortifications and other installations.

Its civil duties have included maintaining and improving inland waterways and harbors, formulating and executing plans for flood control, operating dams and locks, and approving plans for construction of bridges, wharves, piers, and other works over navigable waters. Expansion of the OCE's river and harbor improvement work after the Civil War necessitated the establishment of district offices throughout the United States. The engineer officer in charge of each district reported directly to the Chief of Engineers until 1888 when engineer divisions were created with administrative jurisdiction over the district offices. See RG 392 for related records.

Records Description
Dates: 1824-1990
Volume: 1057 cubic feet

Records of the Boston District Engineer Office, 1900-45. The records relate to fortifications and civil works projects such as flood control, dredging, clearing of wrecks, construction of breakwaters, and other improvements to navigation. They include correspondence, scientific data, reports, and news clippings. Nontextual records include maps, charts, and photographs.

Records of the Portland, Maine, District Engineer Office, 1907-21. The records relate to civil works projects such as dredging, construction of seawalls and breakwaters, flood control, clearing of wrecks, and other improvements to navigation. Included are correspondence, scientific data, survey and technical reports, congressional and legislative documents, minutes of public hearings, economic impact studies and news clippings. Nontextual records include maps, charts, and photographs.

Records of the Providence District Engineer Office, including the offices at New London, 1830-1922; Newport, 1824-1922; and Providence, 1870-1946. The records relate to fortifications, construction of defenses, and civil works such as river, harbor and electric power surveys, and flood control. Included are correspondence, reports, circulars, journals of operations, field notebooks, annual, monthly and daily reports, and proposals. Nontextual records include maps, blueprints, and sketches.

Records of the New England Division Office, Boston, 1859-1990. The records relate primarily to civil works projects such as beach erosion, dams, design and construction of post offices, surveys and dredging of harbors and rivers, removal of wrecks and obstructions, electric power projects, water treatment facilities, flood control and hurricane studies, and reservoirs in New England. Individual series concern the Androscoggin River Basin, 1924-67; the Connecticut River Basin, 1936-70; the Cape Cod Canal, 1890-1940; and interstate water resources, 1950-82. Included are bulletins, comprehensive reports and studies, construction project files, correspondence, environmental statements, memorandums, news clippings, scientific data, operations manuals, orders, regulations, and survey reports. Nontextual records include aerial photographs of Connecticut and western Massachusetts, 1965; photographs documenting construction projects, 1934-80; and blueprints, oversized and annotated maps, charts, drawings, plans, and tabulations, 1859-1970. There are some photographs of military projects, 1918-70.

Records of the Passamaquoddy Tidal Power Project, New England Division Office, Boston, 1920-65 (primarily 1926, 1936, and 1956). The records reflect efforts to construct dams in the Passamaquoddy and Cobscook Bays in the United States and Canada, including the early private efforts by civil engineer Dexter P. Cooper. The dams would use the unusually high tides in the area to produce electricity. The International Passamaquoddy Engineering Board was established to supervise the project. The dam was never completed on the U.S. side, although Canada continued to research and build power-producing dams. Included are correspondence, corrosion studies, cost estimates, newspaper clippings, and reports. Nontextual records include maps, photographs, and plans.

Records of the Boston Area Office, Manhattan Engineer District, 1942-46. The records document plans and specifications for the Oak Ridge, Tennessee, "Y-12 Plant," which used the electromagnetic method to produce fissionable uranium-235. They deal primarily with procurement of supplies and equipment, and the design and construction of individual buildings. The office worked closely with the Stone and Webster Corporation, a Boston engineering firm with primary responsibility for constructing the Oak Ridge plant and town site. The records are field program reports, general correspondence, organizational charts, and personnel rosters.

Records of the U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratories, Hanover, New Hampshire, 1965-79. The records document research on snow, ice, and permafrost, military engineering and construction, environmental and quality assessments, and program and budget planning. They include laboratory notebooks, progress reports, technical reports, and five year plans.

Finding Aids
  • Draft inventories for the Manhattan Engineer District, Passamaquoddy Project, and Boston area office records.
  • Entries 615-621, 623-649, 651, 653-734, and 736-739 in Maizie H. Johnson, comp., Preliminary Inventory of the Textual Records of the Office of the Chief of Engineers, Part II: Records of Engineer Divisions and Districts, NM45 (1965).
Related Microfilm Publications
M65, Letters Sent by the Office of Chief of Engineers Relating to Internal Improvements, 1824-1830;
M66, Letters Sent by the Topographical Bureau of the War Department and by Successor Divisions in the Office of the Chief of Engineers, 1829-1870.

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Record Group 79
Records of the National Park Service

Administrative History
The National Park Service was established in the Department of the Interior by an act of August 25, 1916. It supervises national parks, monuments, historic parks, memorials, parkways, recreation areas, and seashores and is responsible for the promotion and regulation of their use. It establishes and enforces regulations for use, protects parks from fire, regulates concession operators, investigates and recommends proposed new areas, acquires land, and constructs and maintains roads, trails, and buildings. It also engages in research and educational work such as managing guided tours and lectures, marking nature trails, maintaining museums and libraries, and preparing publications and studies in history, archeology, natural history, and wildlife.

Records Description
Dates: 1933-73
Volume: 18 cubic feet

Records of Acadia National Park, Maine, 1933-42. They concern the establishment, operation, and abandonment of work camps and other activities of Federal Government relief agencies, including the Emergency Conservation Corps, Civilian Conservation Corps, and Work Projects Administration. Included are administrative orders and other issuances, correspondence, and monthly work progress reports. Nontextual records include maps and photographs.

Records of the Cape Cod National Seashore and Minuteman National Historical Park, Massachusetts, 1957-73. The records concern their establishment and operations, real estate acquisitions, buildings and grounds, interpretive programs and services, and construction and maintenance. They include correspondence, special studies and reports, archaelogical and environmental surveys, minutes of meetings and conferences, organizational manuals, issuances,and other planning documents.

Records of the Director, Northeast Region, 1955-61. The records document meetings of the Boston National Historic Sites Commission, daily operation of the regional office, environmental issues, inter-agency cooperation, and other subjects. They include correspondence and minutes of meetings.

Records of the Regional Director, 1936-66. The records document development of the Salem Maritime National Historic Site, meetings of the Boston National Historic Sites Commission, daily operation of the regional office, environmental issues, inter-agency cooperation, and other subjects. They include correspondence, newspaper clippings, reports, and minutes of meetings.

Records of the Regional Historian, 1935-43.  The records document his responsibilities  and professional activities, site visits and liaison with non-Federal organizations, and reference work. They include correspondence, reports, and subject files.

Finding Aids
  • Draft inventory.
  • Edward E. Hill, comp., Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the National Park Service, PI 166 (1966).

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Record Group 85
Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service

Administrative History
The Office of Superintendent of Immigration was established in the Department of the Treasury by an act of March 3, 1891, and was designated a bureau in 1895 with responsibility for administering the alien contract-labor laws. In 1903, it became part of the Department of Commerce and Labor and in 1906 was designated the Bureau of Immigration and Naturalization with the addition of functions relating to naturalization. In 1913, it was transferred to the Department of Labor as two separate Bureaus of Immigration and of Naturalization, which were reunited by Executive order on June 10, 1933, to form the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). The INS, which became part of the Department of Justice in 1940, administers laws relating to admission, exclusion, deportation, and naturalization of aliens; patrols U.S. borders; and supervises naturalization work in designated Federal courts. See RG 21 and Donated Materials for related records.

Records Description
Dates: 1787-1955
Volume: 499 cubic feet

Records created by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) in the late 1930s. The records are "dexigraph" copies of naturalization declarations, petitions, and other documents dated 1787-1906, from Federal, State, and local courts in Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. An accompanying card index covers all six New England States, 1787-1906 (Connecticut courts, 1787-1940).

Records of the Boston District Office, 1911-55. The records consist of Chinese case files and certificate of citizenship files, 1944-54, relating to Chinese immigrants and Chinese-Americans departing and re-entering the United States, and to enforcement of the various Chinese Exclusion Acts. Documents in the files include applications for certificates of derivative citizenship together with accompanying investigative reports; certificates of identify and residence; correspondence, INS board proceedings, recommendations and decisions; affidavits, transcripts of testimony, and marriage certificates. Nontextual records include sketches of family residences and villages in China and photographs.

Records of the Montreal District Office, 1900-52. The records are Chinese case files relating mostly to U.S. citizens of Chinese descent who planned to travel abroad and requested confirmation of citizenship to preclude re-entry problems, and to Chinese students, teachers, and businessmen who applied for temporary visas for admission to the United States.

Records of the INS sub-offices in Gloucester and Springfield, Massachusetts; Hartford, Connecticut; and Providence, Rhode Island, 1947-55. The records are Chinese Deportation Files relating mostly to investigations and proceedings in deporting Chinese seamen, students, and teachers whose visas had expired or to individuals attempting to extend their visas.

Finding Aids
Draft inventory.

Related Microfilm Publications
A1151, Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Portland, Maine, Nov. 29, 1893-Mar. 1943;
A1188, Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Providence, Rhode Island, 1911-1943;
M1299, Index to New England Naturalization Petitions, 1791-1906;
M1321, Passenger Lists for Vessels Arriving at Gloucester, MA, 1906-1942;
M1357, Index to Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Galveston, Texas, 1896-1906;
M1358, Index to Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Galveston, Texas, 1906-1951;
M1359, Passenger Lists of Vessel Arriving at Galveston, Texas, 1896-1951;
M1461, Soundex Index to Canadian Border Entries through the St. Albans, Vermont, District, 1895-1924;
M1462, Alphabetical Index to Canadian Border Entries Through Small Ports in Vermont, 1895-1924;
M1463, Soundex Index to Entries into the St. Albans, Vermont, District through Canadian Pacific and Atlantic Ports, 1924-1952;
M1464, Manifest of Passengers Arriving in the St. Albans, VT, District through Canadian Pacific and Atlantic Ports, 1895-1954;
M1465, Manifests of Passengers Arriving in the St. Albans, Vermont, District through Canadian Pacific Ports, 1929-1949;
T518, Index to Passengers Arriving at Providence, Rhode Island, June 18, 1911-Oct. 5, 1954;
T521, Index to Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Boston, Massachusetts, Jan. 1, 1902-June 30, 1906;
T522, Index to Passengers Arriving at New Bedford, Massachusetts, July 1, 1902-Nov. 18, 1954;
T524, Index to Passengers Arriving at Portland, Maine, Jan. 29, 1893-Nov. 22, 1954;
T617, Index to Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Boston, Massachusetts, July 1, 1906-Dec. 31, 1920;
T790, Book Indexes, Boston Passenger Lists, 1899-1940;
T843, Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Boston, Massachusetts, 1891-1943;
T938, Crew Lists of Vessel Arriving at Boston, Massachusetts, 1917-1943;
T944, Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New Bedford, Massachusetts, 1902-1942.

Restrictions
Access to some Chinese case files or portions of documents may be restricted due to privacy concerns.

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Record Group 90
Records of the Public Health Service, 1912-1968

Administrative History
The Public Health Service, originally called the Marine Hospital Service, has its origins in an act of July 16, 1798, which authorized hospitals for the care of sick and disabled American merchant seamen. The scope of its activities was greatly expanded by subsequent legislation, and it became part of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare in 1955 after having been part of the Department of the Treasury from 1798 to 1939 and the Federal Security Agency from 1939 to 1953.

The Public Health Service operates marine hospitals, hospitals for specific diseases, medical facilities for Federal penal institutions, quarantine and health stations, and research institutions and laboratories. It conducts research in the cause, prevention, and control of disease and disseminates health information. See RG 48, RG 57, RG 77, RG114, RG 382, and RG 414 for related records.

Records Description
Dates: 1950-55
Volume: 21 cubic feet

Records of the regional office relating to its role on the New England New York Inter-Agency Committee (NENYIAC). The committee, a coalition of experts, was established in 1950 to formulate an overall plan for the development, use, and conservation of land, water, and related natural resources in New England and parts of New York. The records relate to the work of liaison officer and basin engineer Leonard W. Trager, the Water Supply and Pollution Control study, and other committee work. They include correspondence, data files, reports, and the final report.

Finding Aids
Draft inventory.

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Record Group 92
Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General

Administrative History
In 1818, Congress created a Quartermaster's Department under a single Quartermaster General to ensure an efficient system of supply and accountability of Army officers charged with monies or supplies. At various times, the Quartermaster has been responsible for procurement and distribution of supplies, pay, transportation, and construction. After a number of changes in functions and command relationships, Congress authorized a Quartermaster Corps in 1912 and designated its chief the Quartermaster General in 1914. The Corps was responsible for the operation of a number of general supply depots and subdepots throughout the United States. The Office of the Quartermaster General was abolished in 1962.

Records Description
Dates: 1819-1955
Volume: 7 cubic feet

Records of the following units: Office of the Quartermaster, Boston, 1819-1838; Office of the (Army) Construction Quartermaster, Boston, 1920-21; Construction Quartermaster, Portland, 1902-06; and Construction Quartermaster, Newport, 1902-03. The records document the functions, responsibilities, and activities of the area quartermasters. (The Maine records document land acquisition, new construction, furnishings, utilities, maintenance and repair work, especially at Forts Levett, McKinley, Preble, and Williams near Portland.) They include abstracts, bills of lading, and correspondence. Nontextual records include drawings, maps in a bound volume, and plans.

Records of the 457th Quartermaster Depot, Fort Devens, Massachusetts, 1951-55. The records relate primarily to the assumption of command and are general orders.

Records of the Boston Quartermaster Depot,1918-22, 1941-47. The records relate to wool control, purchasing, and distribution, and to the wreck and salvaged cargo of the S.S. Port Hunter, lost in a collision in November, 1918. The records include correspondence, historical summaries, memorandums, orders, and other issuances.

Records of the Climatic Research Laboratory, Lawrence,  Massachusetts, 1946-48. The records relate to assumption of command, awards, appointments and duty assignments, troop information and education, and other administrative matters. They are orders and memorandums.

Finding Aids
  • Draft inventory.
  • List of plans and drawings.
  • Entries 400-403, 1080, 1081, 1990, and 1997 in Maizie H. Johnson, comp., Preliminary Inventory of the Textual Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General, NM 81 (1967).
  • Entry 2124 in Maizie H. Johnson, comp., Preliminary Inventory of the Textual Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General, Part II, NM 85 (1967).
Related Microfilm Publications
M1845, Card Records of Headstones Provided for Deceased Union Civil War Veterans, ca. 1879-ca. 1903;
M2014, Burial Registers for Military Posts, Camps, and Stations, 1768-1921.

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Record Group 95
Records of the Forest Service

Administrative History
In 1881, a Division of Forestry was established in the Department of Agriculture. It became the Forest Service in 1905 when it assumed responsibility for the administration of forest reserves from the Department of the Interior. From 1933 to 1942, the Service supervised a large part of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) work program.

The Service is responsible for promoting the conservation and best use of national forests and grasslands through development of the National Forest System, cooperating with administrators of State and private forests, and conducting forest and range research programs.

Records Description
Dates: 1914-79
Volume: 51 cubic feet

Records of the White Mountain National Forest, New Hampshire. The records document the development and management of recreational areas, and the cooperative relationship between the Forest Service and the Appalachian Mountain Club (AMC), 1925-28 and 1938-79. Included are recreational area project and history files, correspondence, land development proposals, daily new digests, news clippings and press releases, publications, special use permits, and reports. Nontextual records include blueprints, drawings, maps, and photographs.

Records of the Northeastern Forest Experiment Stations, Durham, New Hampshire, and Orono, Maine, 1947-77. The records document Government research and cooperative efforts in forest management. They include audit and inspection reports, committee records, minutes, press releases, and research publications.

Records of the Green Mountain National Forest, Rutland, Vermont, 1972-80. The records document establishment and development of the forest, research projects, and permits granted. They include correspondence, publications, and reports.

Records of the New England Forest Emergency Project and Northeast Timber Salvage Administration, 1938-43. The records document the organization, functions, operations, and cooperative activities of these two agencies which were established to handle the timber damage caused by the hurricane of September 21, 1938. The records include contracts, correspondence, issuances, and reports. Nontextual records include photographs.

Finding Aids
  • Partial draft inventory.
  • Entry 19 in Harold T. Pinkett and Terry W. Good, comps., Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the Forest Service, PI 18 (1969).

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Record Group 96
Records of the Farmers Home Administration

Administrative History
The Farmers Home Administration (FHA) was established in the Department of Agriculture by an act of August 14, 1946, to succeed the Farm Security Administration (FSA), which had been established in 1937. The FSA succeeded the Resettlement Administration, which had been established in 1935 to administer rural rehabilitation and land programs begun in 1933 under the Subsistence Homesteads Division of the Department of the Interior and the Federal Emergency Relief Administration.

The FHA provides small farmers with credit to construct or repair homes, improve farming operations, or become farm owners, and gives individual guidance in farm and home management. See RG 103 for related records.

Records Description
Dates: 1934-47
Volume: 115 cubic feet

Records of the regional director's office, 1935-47. The records document local agricultural and economic history, and are primarily general correspondence.

Records of selected county offices in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont, 1934-44. The records document paid-in-full rural rehabilitation loans and include "farm and home management plans" submitted by loan applicants, which contain information about the farm family's assets, expenses, food consumption, income, and production. The records are case files.

Records of the Rural Rehabilitation Division, 1937-46. The records document farm ownership loan applications and approvals. They are case files which include appraisal reports, correspondence, deeds, insurance certificates, loan agreements, and mortgages.

Finding Aids
  • Draft inventory.
  • Entries 31-34, 36-38, 42-44, and 133 in Stanley W. Brown and Virgil E. Baugh, comps., Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the Farmers Home Administration, PI 118 (1959).

Restrictions
Access to some loan case files may be restricted because of personal privacy concerns.

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