National Archives at Atlanta

Guide to Archival Holdings at the National Archives Southeast Region (Atlanta)

Record Group 165
Records of the War Department General and Special Staffs

Administrative History

A War Department General Staff was authorized by Congress on February 14, 1903, to include a Chief of Staff, a General Council, and three divisions, which, after frequent reorganizations, developed into the Personnel Division (G-1), the Military Intelligence Division (G-2), the Organization and Training Division (G-3), the Supply Division (G-4), and the War Plans Division (Operations Division after 1942). The General Staff was a separate and distinct staff organization with supervision over most military branches, both line and staff. Its duties were to prepare plans for national defense and the mobilization of military forces in time of war, to investigate and report on questions affecting Army efficiency and preparedness, and to give professional aid to the Secretary of War, general officers, and other superior commanders.

Under provisions of the National Security Act of 1947 the War Department became the Department of the Army within the newly created National Military Establishment, which was renamed the Department of Defense in 1949.

Records Description
Dates: 1918-1919 Volume: 3 cubic feet

Records of the Office of the Military Intelligence Division, Plant Protection Section, District 10, Atlanta. The records relate to investigation of explosions, fires, strikes, and other suspected acts or persons involved in sabotage. The records include a card register of correspondents, correspondence, daily reports, and telegrams.

Finding Aid
Entries 129 and 130 in Olive K. Liebman and Harry W. John, comps., Preliminary Inventory of the Textual Records of the War Department General and Special Staffs, NM 84 (1967).

Record Group 175
Records of the Chemical Warfare Service

Administrative History

The Chemical Warfare Service, a technical service under the General Staff, was established as part of the National Army on June 28, 1918, to develop, produce, and test materials and apparatus for gas warfare and to organize and train military personnel in methods of defense against gas. As part of a War Department reorganization, effective March 9, 1942, it became part of the Services of Supply, later designated Army Service Forces. In 1946, it was again placed under the General Staff, and on September 6, 1946, its name was changed to the Chemical Corps which was abolished on August 1, 1962.

Records Description
Dates: 1947-1950 Volume: 1 cubic foot

Records of the Chemical Procurement District, Atlanta, and the Gulf Chemical Warfare Depot, Huntsville. The records document activities at these sites and include correspondence, inventories, memorandums, mobilization plans, and reports.

Record Group 181
Records of Naval Districts and Shore Establishments

Administrative History

Soon after its establishment in 1798, the Department of the Navy created navy yards and other fleet service shore establishments. A system of naval districts for the United States, its territories, and possessions was not formally established, however, until 1903. This system was supervised by the Bureau of Navigation until 1915, when it became the responsibility of the Chief of Naval Operations. By the end of World War II, the districts exercised almost complete military and administrative control over naval operations within their limits, including naval shipyards, stations, training stations, air installations, and advance bases.

Records Description
Dates: 1845-1855, 1903-1972 Volume: 2,463 cubic feet

Records of the following commands, stations, training facilities, and units:
  • Aviation Officers Schools, Jacksonville, Florida, 1946-1959
  • Charleston Navy Shipyard, Charleston, South Carolina, 1902-1961
  • Fighter Squadron 104, Jacksonville, Florida, 1952-1959
  • Florida Group, Atlantic Reserve Fleet, Green Cove Springs, Florida, 1957-1961
  • Ingalls Shipyard, Pascagoula, Mississippi, 1957-1963
  • Memphis Navy Yard, Memphis, Tennessee, 1845-1855
  • Military Sealift Command, Gulf Subarea, New Orleans, Louisiana, 1965-1967
  • Naval Air Station, Cecil Field, Florida, 1944-1963
  • Naval Air Station, Glynco, Georgia, 1952-1959
  • Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida, 1944-1957
  • Naval Air Station, Miami, Florida, 1918
  • Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Florida, 1947-1969
  • Naval Air Station, Sanford, Florida, 1951-57
  • Naval Air Station, Naval Operating Base and Naval Station, Key West, Florida, 1927-1957
  • Naval Air Technical Training Center, Jacksonville, Florida, 1960-1961
  • Naval Air Technical Training Center, Memphis, Tennessee, 1945-1955
  • Naval Air Training Command, Memphis, Tennessee, 1945-1955
  • Naval Ammunition Dump, Charleston, South Carolina, 1959-1962
  • Naval Auxiliary Air Station, Cabaniss Field, Corpus Christi, Texas, 1946-1947
  • Naval Aviation Medical Center, Pensacola, Florida, 1942-1969
  • Naval Base, Charleston, South Carolina, 1949-1960
  • Naval Base, Key West, Florida, 1933-1957
  • Naval Station, Green Cove Springs, Florida, 1948-1957
  • Naval Station, Port Royal, South Carolina, 1907-1908
  • Seventh Naval District Headquarters, Jacksonville, Florida, 1921-1961
  • Sixth Naval District Headquarters, Charleston, South Carolina, 1903-1963
  • Southern Division, Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Charleston, South Carolina, 1962-1972
The records document administration and general operation of shipyards, including construction, repair and overhaul of ships, naval districts, stations, and bases in peacetime and war, including operations in New Orleans during Hurricane Betsy (September 1965). Included are correspondence, daily logs, and files. Nontextual.records include maps and photographs.

Finding Aid
Partial draft inventory.

Related Microfilm Publications
M89, Letters Received by the Secretary of the Navy From Squadron Commanders, 1841-86.

Restrictions
Access to some files or portions of documents may be restricted because of national security classification.

Record Group 187
Records of the National Resources Planning Board

Administrative History
The National Resources Planning Board (NRPB) was established in the Executive Office of the President by Reorganization Plan No. 1 of 1939. It inherited the functions of the National Planning Board (NPB) of the Federal Emergency Administration of Public Works (created July 20, 1933) and its various successors. The NRPB and its predecessors planned public works, coordinated Federal planning relating to conservation and efficient use of national resources, and encouraged local, State, and regional planning. The NRPB was abolished by an act of June 26, 1943.

In 1934, the NPB began using the regional advisors and State advisory boards of the Public Works Administration for field contacts with State and local governments. On March 1, 1934, the NPB began developing a field organization of its own, establishing 12 Planning Districts throughout the country. The number of districts was subsequently reduced to 11. On May 13, 1937, the 11 planning district offices became nine regional offices. (Two additional regions were subsequently added for Alaska and the Caribbean territories.) The NRPB was liquidated in 1943.

The regional offices primarily acted as clearinghouses of planning information, carried out the Board's activities in the field, and coordinated regional, State, and local natural resource planning activities.

Records Description
Dates: 1937-1943 Volume: 28 cubic feet

Records of the Region 3 (Southeastern) Office, Atlanta, which covered Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina, Tennessee, and from 1942 to 1943, Kentucky. The records document  planning for use of natural resources, especially water, soil, and forests, and development of industry throughout the South, including cooperation with the non Federal Southeastern Regional Planning Commission. The region worked on several projects including the Southern Forest Resources Survey, a Coosa Valley (southern Alabama and Georgia) Planning Project, a Southeastern Florida Joint Investigation, and defense and economic studies. The records include correspondence, minutes, reports, and reference material.

Finding Aid
Entries 17through 26 in Virgil E. Baugh, comp., Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the Regional Offices of the National Resources Planning Board, PI 64 (1954).

Record Group 188
Records of the Office of Price Administration

Administrative History
The Office of Price Administration (OPA) originated in the Price Stabilization and Consumer Protection Divisions of the Advisory Commission to the Council of National Defense on May 29, 1940, and in their successor, the Office of Price Administration and Civilian Supply, created in April 1941 and redesignated the Office of Price Administration by an Executive order of August 28, 1941. The OPA was given statutory recognition as an independent agency by the Emergency Price Control Act of January 30, 1942. Under this legislation the OPA attempted to stabilize prices and rents by establishing maximum prices for commodities (other than agricultural products, which were under the control of the Secretary of Agriculture) and rents in defense areas. It also rationed scarce essential commodities and authorized subsidies for the production of some goods. Most of the price and rationing controls were lifted between August 1945 and November 1946.

Records Description
Dates: 1942-1947 Volume: 390 cubic feet

Records of the Region 4 office, Atlanta, representing Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. The records document the work of the regional executive offices, management field offices, and regional and local district offices of OPA's Accounting, Enforcement, Information, Price, and Rationing Departments as they administered price and rent stabilization and control programs throughout the Southeast. The records include case files, correspondence, instructions, price surveys, publicity kits, reports, and transcripts of speeches.

Records of War Price and Rationing Boards, Charleston. The records document the operation of the rationing programs at the local level. They consist of correspondence, financial records, memorandums, and minutes.

Finding Aids
Meyer H. Fishbein and Elaine C. Bennett, comps., Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the Accounting Department of the Office of Price Administration, PI 32 (1951);

Fishbein, Walter Weinstein, and Albert W. Winthrop, comps., Preliminary Inventory of the Price Department of the Office of Price Administration, PI 95 (1956);

Fishbein et al., comps., Preliminary Inventory of the Rationing Department of the Office of Price Administration, PI 102 (1958);

Betty R. Bucher, comp., Preliminary Inventory of the Information Department of the Office of Price Administration, PI 119 (1959);

Fishbein and Bucher, comps., Preliminary Inventory of the Office of Price Administration, PI 120 (1959).

Record Group 190
Records of the Bureau of War Risk Litigation

Administrative History
The Bureau of War Risk Litigation, established in the Department of Justice on September 11, 1933, defended the United States in suits arising from war risk and life insurance contracts authorized by the War Risk Insurance Act of 1917. The director of the Bureau was under the supervision of the Assistant to the Attorney General until 1942, and later under the Assistant Attorney General for the Claims Division. The Bureau was abolished on June 30, 1945.

Records Description
Dates: 1929-1944 Volume: 2 cubic feet

Records of the Mississippi field offices in Aberdeen, Clarksdale, Hattiesburg, Jackson, Oxford, and Vicksburg. The records document benefits suits filed by veterans or their survivors and consist of closed case dockets.

Finding Aid
Entries 9and 10 in Marion M. Johnson, comp., Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the Bureau of War Risk Litigation, NC 46 (1964).

Record Group 202
Records of the National War Labor Board (World War II)

Administrative History

The National War Labor Board (NWLB) was established in the Office for Emergency Management (OEM) by an Executive order of January 12, 1942. It was to act as final arbiter of wartime labor disputes and to pass on adjustments in certain wages and salaries. An Executive order of September 19, 1945, transferred the NWLB to the Department of Labor. The NWLB was terminated by the Executive order of December 31, 1945, that established the National Wage Stabilization Board (NWSB) with all powers, functions, and responsibilities of the NWLB relating to stabilization of wages and salaries as well as limited functions relating to the settlement of disputes. The NWSB was terminated by an Executive order of December 12, 1946.

While the initial functioning of the NWLB was solely in Washington, DC,the NWLB announced establishment of 10 regional advisory offices on October 29, 1942. The authority of these first regional offices was quite limited, but on January 12, 1943, the NLRB created two new regions and converted the (now 12) regional advisory offices to regional war labor boards with considerable independent authority in resolving disputes. The NWLB also created several special tripartite industry commissions and panels to deal with particular industries nationally.

Records Description
Dates: 1942-1947 Volume: 458 cubic feet

Records of NWLB and NWSB Region IV, Atlanta, representing Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia, and NWLB and NWSB Region V, Cleveland, representing Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia. The records relate to alleged violations of wage stabilization regulations, as well as the administration, operation, organization, and activities of the regional office. Included are case files, central files, minutes, and press releases.

Finding Aid
Entries 165 through 167, 173 through 174, 177 and 178, 201 and 202, 277, 380, 462 through 464, and 486 through 488 in Estelle Rebel, comp., Records of the National War Labor Board (World War II), PI 78 (1955).

Record Group 207
General Records of the Department of Housing and Urban Development

Administrative History
The Department of Housing and Urban Development was established by the Act of September 9, 1965 (79 Stat. 667). The Department coordinates all federal housing programs.

Records Description
Dates: 1992-1994 Volume: 36 cubic feet

Records of Region IV, Office of Hurricane Recovery. The records document damage done by Hurricane Andrew and the work of the state, county, and city governments (Florida, Dade County, Miami) the Federal Emergency Management Agency, private relief agencies, religious organizations, and citizens groups involved with the immediate recovery effort and with long range rebuilding. The records are correspondence.

Record Group 211
Records of the War Manpower Commission

Administrative History

The War Manpower Commission (WMC) was established within the Office for Emergency Management by an Executive order of April 18, 1942. Operating through regional and State WMC offices and local offices of the U.S. Employment Service, it recruited labor for the war effort and essential civilian industries, trained labor for essential jobs, analyzed manpower utilization practices to increase labor efficiency, and accumulated national labor market information. It was terminated by an Executive order of September 19, 1945, and its functions were transferred to the U.S. Employment Service.

Records Description
Dates: 1942-1945 Volume: 79 cubic feet

Records of the Region VII office, Atlanta,  representing Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina, and Tennessee. The records relate to the employment stabilization program and discriminatory hiring, the economic condition of the area and its response to wartime programs and controls. Included are appeals case files, correspondence, minutes, and narrative and statistical reports.

Finding Aid
Box contents list.

Record Group 219
Records of the Office of Defense Transportation

Administrative History
The Office of Defense Transportation (ODT) was established in the Office for Emergency Management on December 18, 1941, to promote the maximum utilization of domestic transportation facilities to support the war effort. It was authorized to coordinate activities of Federal agencies and private transportation groups to prevent congestion and make maximum use of available resources.

The ODT employed a network of regional offices to facilitate the implementation of its activities, including regional administrative offices, which oversaw Regional Operating Managers in significant transportation hubs. There were also District and Federal Managers responsible for specific firms and field representatives.

Records Description
Dates: 1942-1946 Volume: 38 cubic feet

Records of the Office of the Southern Regional Director, Railway Transport Department. The records relate to railway transportation including bridges, cars, freight, locomotives, shippers, storage permits, and the Interstate Commerce Commission. They are primarily correspondence.

Records of the Office of the Director and Office of the General Counsel, Region IV. The records document the Southern region's oversight of highway, rail, and water transportation and include correspondence, general orders, memorandums, minutes, and reports.

Record Group 228
Records of the Committee on Fair Employment Practice

The first Committee on Fair Employment Practice was established in the Office of Production Management (OPM) by Executive Order 8802 of June 25, 1941, and then assigned to the War Manpower Commission in 1942. That committee was abolished by Executive Order 9346 of May 27, 1943, which created a new Committee on Fair Employment Practice in the Office for Emergency Management. The new Committee formulated and interpreted policies to combat racial and religious discrimination in employment; received, investigated, and adjusted complaints of such discrimination; and assisted Government agencies, employers, and labor unions with problems of discrimination. The Committee terminated its activities on June 28, 1946.

The first FEPC utilized six field investigators and a few field clerical employees and held public hearings in several major cities across the country. The second FEPC initially established nine regional offices and two suboffices, continuing and expanding the network of the first FEPC's field investigators. Additional offices and suboffices were added later.

Records Description
Dates: 1941-1946 Volume: 8 cubic feet

Records of the Region 7 office, Atlanta, representing Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina, and Tennessee. The records document complaints about discrimination by Federal agencies, labor unions, and private employers. Included are administrative and case files.

Finding Aid
Draft preliminary inventory.

Record Group 237
Records of the Federal Aviation Administration

Administrative History
The Civil Aeronautics Act of June 23, 1938, established an independent Civil Aeronautics Authority "to promote the development and safety and to provide for the regulation of civil aeronautics." In 1940, the authority was divided into a Civil Aeronautics Board with safety regulatory authority and a Civil Aeronautics Administration to enforce civil air regulations; aid in the development of a national airport system; and plan, construct, and operate the Federal Airways System. Both organizations were part of the Department of Commerce until the establishment in 1958 of the Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) , which assumed all of their functions. The FAA became a part of the Department of Transportation by an act of October 15, 1966, and was redesignated the Federal Aviation Administration.

Records Description
Dates: 1940-1983 Volume: 169 cubic feet

Records of the Southern Regional Office, Atlanta. The records document all aspects of FAA activity in the Southeast, including airport airspace analysis, certification of pilots and equipment, construction and modification of facilities, inspection and enforcement activities, installation and repair of aids to navigation, and some accident investigations. The records include administrative files, case files, labor arbitration files, management project files, newsletters, and studies.

Record Group 245
Records of the Solid Fuels Administration for War

Administrative History
The Bituminous Coal Conservation Act of 1935 created the first Bituminous Coal Commission. A Commission order of October 9, 1935, established 23 producer districts throughout the country. The first Commission was succeeded by the second Bituminous Coal Commission in 1937, when the 1935 act was modified to take into account constitutional objections to the initial act. Both Commissions were independent Federal agencies. On April 3, 1939, the Commission's functions were transferred to the Department of the Interior, and in July, the Bituminous Coal Division was established within the department. Authorization of the Division lapsed on August 24, 1943, and many of its functions, as well as its district offices, were transferred to the Solid Fuels Administration for War.

The two Bituminous Coal Commissions and the Bituminous Coal Division determined production costs, regulated prices and wages, and regulated marketing procedures for the bituminous coal industry. To this end, they established producer districts, gathered statistics, undertook research, and compiled the Bituminous Coal Code.

On November 5, 1941, a letter from the President to the Secretary of the Interior established the Office of Solid Fuels Coordinator for National Defense within the Department of the Interior. The name of the office was changed to the Office of Solid Fuels Coordinator for War on May 25, 1942. Under both names, the office was essentially a planning and advisory agency. Executive Order 9332 of April 19 transformed the Office into the Solid Fuels Administration for War (SFAW). The SFAW had the legal authority, lacking in its predecessor, to implement an emergency distribution and controls program.

With the lapsing of authorization for the Bituminous Coal Division on August 24, 1943, the SFAW inherited its district office structure, staff, and records, renaming the district offices area distribution offices. As had been the case with the district offices of the Bituminous Coal Commissions and the Bituminous Coal Division, SFAW area offices were responsible for entire States or, for certain counties within one or more States. The SFAW area offices were responsible for regulating the distribution and sale, as well as production, of all varieties of coal. All field offices were closed on April 30, 1947. The SFAW itself ceased to exist on June 30 of that year under an Executive order of May 6, 1947.

Records Description
Dates: 1937-1947 Volume: 237 cubic feet

Records of the area offices in:
  • Ashland, Kentucky;
  • Atlanta, Georgia;
  • Birmingham, Alabama;
  • Charlotte, North Carolina;
  • Knoxville, Tennessee.
The records relate to coal production and retail distribution, and the operations of coal producers, operators, and dealers. They consist of correspondence and surveys.

Finding Aid
Entries 12 through 22, 25 through 28, 34, 76, and 147 in Forrest R. Holdcamper, comp., Preliminary Inventory of the Field Records of the Solid Fuels Administration for War, NC 145 (1966).

Record Group 252
Records of the Office of the Housing Expediter

A Housing Expediter was appointed in the Office of War Mobilization and Reconversion by the President on December 12, 1945, to plan, coordinate, and expedite postwar housing programs. The Expediter was authorized by an Executive order in January 1946 to plan and coordinate a veterans' housing program. The Office of the Housing Expediter, which had been authorized by an act of Congress of May 22, 1946, was terminated by an Executive order of July 31, 1951, and its functions were transferred to the Economic Stabilization Agency and the Housing and Home Finance Agency.

Records Description
Dates: 1941-1953 Volume: 156 cubic feet

Records of the region IV office, Atlanta, representing Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. The records relate to office operations and procedures; activities of local advisory boards; changes in local housing conditions, compliance with or enforcement of rent control regulations, decontrol of rent, public affairs, staff training; and samples of rental prices. Included are appeal cases, briefs, correspondence, enforcement case files, narrative reports, petitions, and subject files.

Records of the following area rent offices:
  • Atlanta, Georgia, 1942-1952;
  • Greenville, South Carolina, 1945-1950;
  • Memphis, Tennessee, 1942-1952;
  • Miami, Florida, 1948-1949;
  • Nashville, Tennessee, 1942-1952;
  • St. Petersburg, Florida, 1945-1950;
  • Savannah, Georgia, 1942-1949.
The records relate to rent interpretations, veterans housing priorities, and other rent control issues. They include correspondence, minutes of advisory board meetings, press releases, samples of rental prices and conditions in each area, and special case files.

Record Group 253
Records of the Petroleum Administration for War

Administrative History
An Office of Petroleum Coordinator for National Defense was established in the Department of the Interior on May 28, 1941. It was abolished by Executive Order 9276, of December 2, 1942, which created the Petroleum Administration for War (PAW) under the Secretary of the Interior. The Petroleum Coordinator and the PAW were responsible for wartime conservation, use, marketing, and development of oil and other petroleum products. The PAW was terminated on May 8, 1946, by Executive Order 9718.

Records Description
Dates: 1943-1945 Volume: 1 cubic foot

Records of  the Zone 4 office, Charlotte. The records relate to the blending of premium gasoline, farmers' use of petroleum, and petroleum marketing and development. The records are primarily correspondence.

Records of the office for Zones 4 and 5, Atlanta. The records relate to the conservation, demand, use, marketing, and development of petroleum. They consist primarily of correspondence and reports.

Finding Aid
Entries 940 through 944 in Albert Whimpey and James R. Fuchs, comps., Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the Petroleum Administration for War, PI 31 (1951).

Record Group 255
Records of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Administrative History
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was preceded by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), created by an act of March 3, 1915. The principal activities of the Committee were the scientific study of flight and aeronautical research and experiment. The Committee was terminated by an act of July 29, 1958, that created NASA and transferred to it committee functions and records.

Records Description
Dates: 1936-1993 Volume: 1,631 cubic feet

Records of  the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama, 1954-1998. The records relate to research and development of various NASA projects, including Apollo 13, NOVA, NERVA, Saturn Rocket, and SKYLAB; the work of NASA boards; the work of Wernher Von Braun; public affairs; and upper level management activities. Included are briefs, management issuance files, news releases, newspapers (the Marshall Star), program reviews, project files, publications, reassessment files, speech files, and technical reports. Nontextual records include charts, diagrams, and photographs.

Records of the John F. Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida, 1959-1997. The records document the organizational development of the facility from its beginning as a launch operations center under the Marshall Space Flight Center to the independent NASA Center; KSC's subsequent programs including Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, the space shuttle, and Skylab; public affairs, including Spaceport News; and  personnel assignments. Included are astronaut medical records, correspondence, management issuances files, news releases, personnel authorization vouchers, project files, publications, real property management files, special project files, training plans, and transcripts of speeches. Nontextual records include photographs.

Records of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) Subcommittee on Lightning Hazards to Aircraft, 1936-1964. The records relate to research into effects of lightning on metal and pilots' vision, the potential of non-metallic aircraft, and other activities. The records consist of correspondence, minutes, published and technical reports, and questionnaires.

Finding Aids
For the Kennedy Space Center photographs: partial index

Restrictions
Access to some files or portions of documents may be restricted because of national security classification.

Record Group 269
General Records of the General Services Administration

Administrative History
The General Services Administration (GSA) was established as an independent agency by the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of June 30, 1949. The act consolidated and transferred to GSA certain real and personal property and related functions formerly assigned to various agencies. Its purpose is to provide an economical and efficient system for managing Government property and services, including such activities as constructing and operating buildings, procuring and distributing supplies, disposing of surplus property, managing traffic and communications, and stockpiling strategic and critical materials.

Records Description
Dates: 1973 Volume: 1 cubic foot

Records of the Administration and Budget Division, Regional Office, Atlanta. The records relate to budget estimates and justifications for 1973. They are primarily correspondence.

Record Group 270
Records of the War Assets Administration

Administrative History
The War Assets Administration (WAA) was established in the Office for Emergency Management by Executive order on March 25, 1946. The chief WAA function was the disposal of surplus consumer, capital, and producer goods; industrial and maritime real property; and airports and aircraft located in the United States and its territories. The WAA was abolished by an act of June 30, 1949, and its functions were transferred to the newly created General Services Administration.

Records Description
Dates: 1946-1950 Volume: 940 cubic feet

Records of the regional office, Atlanta. The records document disposal, through sale or donation, of surplus real property, such as Army Air Corps training bases, Army and Navy ordnance plants, prisoner-of-war camps, recruit depots, shipyards, and other Federal installations in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. They include the reporting of property as excess, notification of availability, inspection and appraisal, and approval of disposition. The records are case files, which generally include correspondence, deeds, memorandums, narrative reports, reports of survey and title searches. Nontextual records include architectural and engineering plans, blueprints, maps, and photographs.

Finding Aids
Preliminary inventory.

Box contents list for a portion of the records.

Partial database index of case files (by installation).

Record Group 291
Records of the Federal Property Resources Service

Administrative History
The Property Management and Disposal Service (PMDS), established July 29, 1966, as part of the Federal Property Resources Service, assumed functions formerly assigned to the Defense Materials Service and the Utilization and Disposal Service. PMDS acquires, stores, and manages inventories of strategic and critical materials and promotes maximum utilization of Federal personal and real property through donations, sales, and other authorized methods.

Records Description
Dates: 1959-1971 Volume: 162 cubic feet

Records of the regional office, Atlanta. The records document the disposal of surplus Federal property such as military installations, post office sites, and Veterans Administration hospitals throughout the region. Included are appraisals, correspondence, lease agreements, reports, site management files, and title papers. Nontextual records include maps.

Record Group 293
Records of the Wage and Salary Stabilization Boards of the Economic Stabilization Agency

Administrative History
The Wage Stabilization Board was established by Executive Order 10161 of September 9, 1950, to control wages and salaries during the Korean War. In May 1951, a Salary Stabilization Board was created with authority over administrative, executive, and professional salaries. Wage controls were suspended February 6, 1953, and the boards were terminated April 30, 1953.

Records Description
Dates: 1951-1953 Volume: 11 cubic feet

Records of the Region V Board, Atlanta. The records document decisions concerning labor and wages and other board activities throughout the region. Included are enforcement control cards, wage-hour control cards, and wage data cards.

Record Group 295
Records of the Office of Price Stabilization

Administrative History

The Office of Price Stabilization was established within the Economic Stabilization Agency on January 24, 1951, to obtain voluntary compliance with measures to stabilize prices and to establish and administer price regulations during the Korean War. It worked through regional and district offices until it was abolished on June 30, 1953.

Records Description
Dates: 1951-1953 Volume: 13 cubic feet

Records of the regional office, Atlanta. The records relate to regional procedures and community pricing surveys and reports, as well as the ceiling price programs for the cities of Montgomery and Nashville. The records are correspondence, issuances, memorandums, reports, rulings, and surveys.

Related Microfilm Publications
T460, Defense History Program Studies Prepared During the Korean War Period.

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